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Cover illustration: Annual Lantern Festival dragon procession designed to renew the flow of earth’s geomantic energies into village agricultural and lineage space. Photo by Tam Wai Lun, taken in 2001 in Gutian township, Liancheng county, Fujian.

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ISSN 0169-9520

ISBN 978-90-04-38311-1 (hardback)

ISBN 978-90-04-38572-6 (e-book)

Copyright 2019 by Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands.

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Table of Contents
Index Card
References
  • John Lagerwey & Mark Kalinowski“Introduction,” Early Chinese Religion I: Shang through Han (1250 BC–220 AD) pp. 137.

  • Robert Eno“Shang State Religion,” Early Chinese Religion I: Shang through Han (1250 BC–220 AD) pp. 41102.

  • Martin Kern“Bronze Inscriptions, the Shijing and the Shangshu: The Evolution of the Ancestral Sacrifice During the Western Zhou,” Early Chinese Religion I: Shang through Han (1250 BC–220 AD) pp. 143200.

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  • Kominami Ichirô“Rituals for the Earth,” Early Chinese Religion I: Shang through Han (1250 BC–220 AD) pp. 20134.

  • Constance Cook“Ancestor Worship during the Eastern Zhou,” Early Chinese Religion I: Shang through Han (1250 BC–220 AD) pp. 23779.

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  • Mu-chou Poo“Ritual and Ritual Texts in Early China,” Early Chinese Religion I: Shang through Han pp. 281313.

  • Yuri Pines“Chinese History Writing between the Sacred and the Secular,” Early Chinese Religion I: Shang through Han (1250 BC–220 AD) pp. 31540.

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  • Marc Kalinowski“Diviners and Astrologers under the Eastern Zhou: Transmitted Texts and Recent Archaeological Discoveries,” Early Chinese Religion I: Shang through Han (1250 BC–220 AD) pp. 34196.

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  • Fu-shih Lin“The Image and Status of Shamans in Ancient China,” Early Chinese Religion I: Shang through Han (1250 BC–220 AD) pp. 397458.

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  • Romain Graziani“The Subject and the Sovereign: Exploring the Self in Early Chinese Self-Cultivation,” Early Chinese Religion I: Shang through Han (1250 BC–220 AD) pp. 459517.

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  • Mark Csikszentmihàlyi“Ethics and Self-Cultivation Practice in Early China,” Early Chinese Religion I: Shang through Han (1250 BC–220 AD) pp. 51942.

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  • Mark Edward Lewis“The Mythology of Early China,” Early Chinese Religion I: Shang through Han pp. 54394.

  • Vera Dorofeeva-Lichtmann “Ritual Practices for Constructing Terrestrial Space (Warring States-Early Han),” Early Chinese Religion I: Shang through Han (1250 BC–220 AD) pp. 595644.

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  • Jean Levi“The Rite, the Norm and the Dao: Philosophy of Sacrifice and Transcendence of Power in Ancient China,” Early Chinese Religion I: Shang through Han (1250 BC–220 AD) pp. 64592.

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  • Michael Nylan“Classics Without Canonization: Learning and Authority in Qin and Han,” Early Chinese Religion I: Shang through Han (1250 BC–220 AD) pp. 72176.

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  • Marianne Bujard“State and Local Cults in Han Religion,” Early Chinese Religion I: Shang through Han (1250 BC–220 AD) pp. 777811.

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  • Roel Sterckx“The Economics of Religion in Warring States and Early Imperial China,” Early Chinese Religion I: Shang through Han (1250 BC–220 AD) pp. 83980.

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  • K.E. Brashier“Eastern Han Commemorative Stele: Laying the Cornerstones of Public Memory,” Early Chinese Religion I: Shang through Han (1250 BC–220 AD) pp. 102759.

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  • Grégoire Espesset“Latter Han Religious Mass Movements and the Early Taoist Church,” Early Chinese Religion I: Shang through Han (1250 BC–220 AD) pp. 10611102.

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  • Li JianminThey Shall Expel Demons: Etiology, the Medical Canon, and the Transformation of Medical Techniques before the Tang,” Early Chinese Religion I: Shang through Han (1250 BC–220 AD) pp. 110350.

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  • John Lagerwey“Introduction,” Early Chinese Religion II: The Period of Division (220–589 AD) pp. 150.

  • Chen Shuguo“State Religious Ceremonies,” Early Chinese Religion II: The Period of Division (220–589 AD) pp. 53142.

  • Li Gang“State Religious Policy,” Early Chinese Religion II: The Period of Division (220–589 AD) pp. 193274.

  • Fu-shih Lin“Shamans and Politics,” Early Chinese Religion II: The Period of Division (220–589 AD) pp. 275318.

  • Robert Campany“Seekers of Transcendence and their Communities in this World (pre-350 AD),” Early Chinese Religion II: The Period of Division (220–589 AD) pp. 34594.

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  • Terry Kleeman“Community and Daily Life in the Early Daoist Church,” Early Chinese Religion II: The Period of Division (220–589 AD) pp. 395436.

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  • John Kieschnick“Buddhist Monasticism,” Early Chinese Religion II: The Period of Division (220–589 AD) pp. 54574.

  • Li Yuqun“Classification, Layout, and Iconography of Buddhist Cave Temples and Monasteries,” Early Chinese Religion II: The Period of Division (220–589 AD) pp. 575738.

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  • Sylvie Hureau“Translations, Apocrypha, and the Emergence of the Buddhist Canon”Early Chinese Religion II: The Period of Division (220–589 AD) pp. 74174.

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  • Wang Chengwen“The Revelation and Classification of Daoist Scriptures,” Early Chinese Religion II: The Period of Division (220–589 AD) pp. 775890.

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  • François Martin“Buddhism and Literature,” Early Chinese Religion II: The Period of Division (220–589 AD) pp. 891952.

  • Paul Kroll“Daoist Verse and the Quest of the Divine,” Early Chinese Religion II: The Period of Division (220–589 AD) pp. 95388.

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  • Mu-chou Poo“Images and Ritual Treatment of Dangerous Spirits,” Early Chinese Religion II: The Period of Division (220–589 AD) pp. 107594.

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  • Hou Xudong“The Buddhist Pantheon,” Early Chinese Religion II: The Period of Division (220–589 AD) pp. 10951168.

  • Sylvie Hureau“Buddhist Rituals,” Early Chinese Religion II: The Period of Division (220–589 AD) pp. 120744.

  • Pengzhi“Daoist Rituals,” Early Chinese Religion II: The Period of Division (220–589 AD) pp. 12451350.

  • James Robson“Buddhist Sacred Geography,” Early Chinese Religion II: The Period of Division (220–589 AD) pp. 135198.

  • Gil Raz“Daoist Sacred Geography,” Early Chinese Religion II: The Period of Division (220–589 AD) pp. 13991442.

  • John Lagerwey“Introduction,” Modern Chinese Religion I: Song-Liao-Jin-Yuan (960–1368 AD) pp. 170.

  • Patricia Ebrey“Song Government Policy,” Modern Chinese Religion I: Song-Liao-Jin-Yuan (960–1368 AD) pp. 73137.

  • Chen Guanwei &Chen Shuguo“State Rituals,” Modern Chinese Religion I: Song-Liao-Jin-Yuan (960–1368 AD) pp. 13866.

  • Joseph McDermott“The Village Quartet,” Modern Chinese Religion I: Song-Liao-Jin-Yuan (960–1368 AD) pp. 169228.

  • Fu-shih Lin“‘Old Customs and New Fashions’: An Examination of Features of Shamanism in Song China,” Modern Chinese Religion I: Song-Liao-Jin-Yuan (960–1368 AD) pp. 22982.

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  • Matsumoto Kôichi“Daoism and Popular Religion in the Song,” Modern Chinese Religion I: Song-Liao-Jin-Yuan (960–1368 AD) pp. 285327.

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  • Daniel Stevenson“Buddhist Ritual in the Song,” Modern Chinese Religion I: Song-Liao-Jin-Yuan (960–1368 AD) pp. 328442.

  • Fabien Simonis“Ghosts or Mucus? Medicine for Madness: New Doctrines, Therapies, and Rivalries,” Modern Chinese Religion I: Song-Liao-Jin-Yuan (960–1368 AD) pp. 60339.

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  • Shih-shan Susan Huang“Daoist Visual Culture,” Modern Chinese Religion I: Song-Liao-Jin-Yuan (960–1368 AD) pp. 9291050.

  • Pierre Marsone“Daoism Under the Jurchen Jin Dynasty,” Modern Chinese Religion I: Song-Liao-Jin-Yuan (960–1368 AD) pp. 111159.

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  • Juhn Ahn“Buddhist Self-Cultivation Practice,” Modern Chinese Religion I: Song-Liao-Jin-Yuan (960–1368 AD) pp. 116086.

  • Curie Virág“Self-Cultivation as Praxis in Song Neo-Confucianism,” Modern Chinese Religion I: Song-Liao-Jin-Yuan (960–1368 AD) pp. 11871232.

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  • Linda Walton“Academies in the Changing Religious Landscape,” Modern Chinese Religion I: Song-Liao-Jin-Yuan (960–1368 AD) pp. 123369.

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  • Michael Fuller“Moral Intuitions and Aesthetic Judgments: The Interplay of Poetry and Daoxue in Southern Song China,” Modern Chinese Religion I: Song-Liao-Jin-Yuan (960–1368 AD) pp. 130777.

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  • Chang Woei Ong“Confucian Thoughts,” Modern Chinese Religion I: Song-Liao-Jin-Yuan (960–1368 AD) pp. 13781432.

  • Mark Halperin“Buddhists and Southern Chinese Literati in the Mongol Era,” Modern Chinese Religion I: Song-Liao-Jin-Yuan (960–1368 AD) pp. 143492.

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  • Vincent GoossaertJan Kiely and John Lagerwey“Introduction,” Modern Chinese Religion II: 1850–2015 pp. 160.

  • David Faure“The Introduction of Economics in China, 1850–2010,” Modern Chinese Religion II: 1850–2015 pp. 6588.

  • Grace Shen“Scientism in the Twentieth Century,” Modern Chinese Religion II: 1850–2015 pp. 91137.

  • Volker Scheid & Eric Karchmer“History of Chinese Medicine, 1890–2010,” Modern Chinese Religion II: 1850–2015 pp. 141194.

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  • Walter Davis“Art, Aesthetics, and Religion in Modern China,” Modern Chinese Religion II: 1850–2015 pp. 197257.

  • Arif Dirlik“The Discourse of ‘Chinese Marxism’,” Modern Chinese Religion II: 1850–2015 pp. 30265.

  • Ellen Oxfeld“Moral Discourse, Moral Practice, and the Rural Family in Modern China,” Modern Chinese Religion II: 1850–2015 pp. 40132.

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  • Michael Szonyi“Lineages and the Making of Contemporary China,” Modern Chinese Religion II: 1850–2015 pp. 43387.

  • Xiaofei Kang“Women and the Religious Question in Modern China,” Modern Chinese Religion II: 1850–2015 pp. 491559.

  • Angela Leung“Charity, Medicine, and Religion: The Quest for Modernity in Canton (ca. 1870–1937),” Modern Chinese Religion II: 1850–2015 pp. 579612.

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  • André Laliberté“Religions and Philanthropy in Chinese Societies Since 1978,” Modern Chinese Religion II: 1850–2015 pp. 61348.

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  • Wang Chien-ch’uan“Spirit Writing Groups in Modern China (1840–1937): Textual Production, Public Teachings, and Charity,” Modern Chinese Religion II: 1850–2015 pp. 65184.

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  • David Ownby“Redemptive Societies in the Twentieth Century,” Modern Chinese Religion II: 1850–2015 pp. 685727.

  • Ji Zhe“Buddhist Institutional Innovations,” Modern Chinese Religion II: 1850–2015 pp. 731766.

  • Sébastien Billioud“The Hidden Tradition: Confucianism and Its Metamorphoses in Modern and Contemporary China,” Modern Chinese Religion II: 1850–2015 pp. 767805.

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  • Xun Liu“Daoism from the Late Qing to Early Republican Periods,” Modern Chinese Religion II: 1850–2015 pp. 80637.

  • Melissa Inouye“Miraculous Modernity: Charismatic Traditions and Trajectories within Chinese Protestant Christianity,” Modern Chinese Religion II: 1850–2015 pp. 884919.

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  • Lizhu Fan and Na Chen“The Revival and Development of Popular Religion in China, 1980–Present,” Modern Chinese Religion II: 1850–2015 pp. 92348.

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  • Adam Yuet Chau“The Commodification of Religion in Chinese Societies,” Modern Chinese Religion II: 1850–2015 pp. 94976.

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