Notes on Contributors

In: Religion in Ephesos Reconsidered
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Notes on Contributors

François Kirbihler

is currently lecturer in Roman history at the University of Lorraine (Nancy). His research interests focus on the history of municipal institutions and social history in Ephesos and Asia Minor: several of his works concern women, political cults in Ephesos, late republican administrative history, and the prosopography of elites.

Sabine Ladstätter

received her Ph.D. from the University of Vienna in 1997 and is director of the Austrian Archaeological Institute and the excavations at Ephesos. She has published widely on the site of Ephesos, including monographs, edited volumes, book chapters, and journal articles.

Renate Johanna Pillinger

received her Ph.D. in classical archaeology and philology from the University of Vienna in 1976. From 1999 until 2016, she was university professor for early Christian archaeology at the Institute for Classical Archaeology at the University of Vienna. She is a specialist in the archaeology and interpretation of late antique and early Christian monuments.

Andreas Pülz

is director of the Institute for the Study of Ancient Culture at the Austrian Academy of Sciences. He studied protestant theology, classical archaeology and ancient history. His research focuses on late antiquity, early Christian and Byzantine archaeology. His current projects concern early Byzantine episcopal residences and districts in Ephesos and Side/Turkey.

Elisabeth Rathmayr

studied classical archaeology and ancient history at the Paris Lodron University of Salzburg. From 1999 until 2014 she was part of the Terrace House 2 team, and wrote and/or edited major portions of the volumes Das Hanghaus 2 in Ephesos. Since 2016, she is project head of the Fonds zur Förderung der wissenschaftlichen Forschung project Archaeological contexts of inscriptions in the private sphere (P 29261) carried out at the Institute for the Study of Ancient Culture at the Austrian Academy of Sciences in Vienna.

Thekla Schulz

received her degree in architecture from the Technical University in Braunschweig in 1986. Her Ph.D. followed in 1994 at the Technical University of Munich. Between 1995 and 2015 she was professor for history of architecture at the Technical University in Regensburg. Since 2015, she has been head of the Institute of Historical Building Research and World Heritage Studies at the Technical University of Berlin. Her areas of research include projects in Greece, Turkey, Jordan, and Nepal.

Alexander Sokolicek

studied classical archaeology, ancient history, epigraphy and numismatics at the University of Vienna. He finished his MA in 1998, followed by his Ph.D. in 2003, with a dissertation titled Diatichisma: Zu dem Phänomen geteilter griechischer Städte, which was published with the Austrian Archaeological Institute Vienna in 2009. His study focuses on ancient fortifications, urban and architectural studies, and field work. Between 2012 and 2015 he was a field director of the excavations of Aphrodisias (Institute of Fine Arts, NYU); since 2016 he has been senior researcher at the Austrian Archaeological Institute. Recent projects include the city walls of Aigeira, funded by the Austrian research fund FWF, and urban studies in Pompeii, Velia, and Ephesos.

Martin Steskal

studied classical archaeology and ancient history at the University of Vienna. He is currently a tenured scholar at the Austrian Archaeological Institute at the Austrian Academy of Sciences in Vienna, where he directs archaeological field projects and works as a lecturer at the Department of Classical Archaeology at the University of Vienna. Since 2015 he is the assistant director of the excavations of Ephesos. His research interests include ancient mortuary landscapes and practice, origin and migration, archaeodiet, the built environment, ancient settlement patterns, Greek and Roman cultural and social history, the Roman East, Ptolemaic-Roman Egypt, Hellenistic-Roman Croatia, and the functional analysis of material culture.

Dirk Steuernagel

born 1964, has been professor of classical archaeology at the University of Regensburg (Germany) since 2010. His main fields of research interest include Etruscan archaeology, archaeology of ancient religion, and Roman urbanism. He has been working on a project on the Upper Agora at Ephesos since 2014.

Christine M. Thomas

received her Ph.D. in 1995 from Harvard University, and is Cordano Endowed Chair in Catholic Studies at the University of California, Santa Barbara. Her publications include a catalogue of votive steles for the Ankara Museum and numerous articles on ancient Ephesos.

Hilke Thür

received her degree in architecture from the technical university in Munich in 1967 and her PhD in classical archeology from the University of Vienna in 1981. She is a University Docent at the University of Vienna and was a contributor to the Ephesos excavation from 1975 to 2007. Her main areas of research are Hellenistic and Roman architecture, housing in the ancient world, fountains, grave and memorial monuments in Asia Minor, and architectural decoration in Asia Minor.

Lilli Zabrana

obtained a Master’s degree of classical archaeology, pre- and early history and art history at the University of Vienna in 2005. She has participated in numerous fieldwork projects in Austria, Germany, Italy, Montenegro, Turkey, Israel, Jordan, Syria, and Egypt since 1995. In 2009 she completed the Master program Conservation of Heritage at the Technical University of Berlin, focusing on building research. She has been employed at the ÖAI since 2010, and earned her doctorate from the Technical University of Berlin in 2014.

Norbert Zimmermann

is scientific director at the German Archaeological Institute at Rome, Italy. He has studied Christian archaeology, art history, and Italian philology at Bonn, Rome, and Munich. From 1998 to 2014 he was a researcher at the Institute for the Study of Ancient Culture, Austrian Academy of Sciences, and he is a member of the Austrian excavation team at Ephesos.