Conventions on the Use of Proper Names

In: A Companion to the Hussites
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Conventions on the Use of Proper Names

The orthography of names and places varies widely in international scholarship on the Hussites. The tendency in most recent scholarship in English is to use vernacular Czech forms, except when English forms have already gained widespread currency. The present volume usually renders a figure’s name as it appears in the modern form of his or her vernacular language (e.g. Jakoubek of Stříbro). However, for persons whose names have long appeared in their Anglicized forms, we have followed suit. This is the case with names like Jerome of Prague, Nicholas of Dresden, Matthew of Cracow, and for well-known figures from the history of philosophy, such as Hugh of Saint-Victor, John Buridan, and John Stojković of Ragusa. Place names, too, usually take their regional forms, except when the Anglicized form is in widespread use (e.g. Prague). Names of rulers (Wenceslas IV, Ladislas Posthumous, George of Poděbrady, Louis of Bavaria) and saints (St. Wenceslas, St. Adalbert) also appear in English. Where the Latin name is often used in English scholarship, we retain the Latin (e.g. Iohannes Andreae, Nicolaus Magni); where helpful, we indicate both forms (Vojtěch Raňkův of Ježov/Adalbert Ranconis de Ericinio). Readers who may be unfamiliar with the non-Anglicized forms of certain names are referred to the following index.