A Gold Medallion Representing Fortuna and Glycon From the Necropolis of Chersonesus

in Ancient Civilizations from Scythia to Siberia
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Abstract

A burial chamber on the western necropolis of Chersonesus yielded, among burial goods of the 2nd-3rd c. A.D., a stamped gold medallion depicting Fortuna and Glycon. The cult of Fortuna was widespread in the Roman Empire, especially after the Antonines, and finds of statuettes show it to have been popular on the N. Black Sea coast too. Images of Glycon, the human-headed snake of Alexander the ps.-Prophet, are uncommon outside Egypt, though are known in Asia Minor: they are very rare accompanied by other deities. It is argued that the medallion was struck at Ionopolis near Miletus and its presence at Chersonesus is not improbable given the intensity of trading links between this city and cities of the S. Black Sea coast in the late 2nd-carly 3rd c. A.D. Also discussed is a two-sided indication, made from a 4th c. B.C. silver coin from Heraclea and found in the same complex of grave goods as the medallion.

A Gold Medallion Representing Fortuna and Glycon From the Necropolis of Chersonesus

in Ancient Civilizations from Scythia to Siberia

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