Nicias in Thucydides and Aristophanes Part II: Nicias and Divine Justice in Aristophanes

in Polis: The Journal for Ancient Greek Political Thought
Restricted Access
Get Access to Full Text
Rent on DeepDyve

Have an Access Token?



Enter your access token to activate and access content online.

Please login and go to your personal user account to enter your access token.



Help

Have Institutional Access?



Access content through your institution. Any other coaching guidance?



Connect

Thucydides and Aristophanes, austere historian and ribald comic playwright, lived in an Athens that had, since Themistocles, been moving from a regime of ancestral piety towards a secular empire. Thucydides suggests an agreement between his understanding and that of the pious Nicias — over and against this move. Aristophanes too is a vigorous proponent of peace, and the conclusions of many of his plays appear to suggest or encourage a conservative disposition towards ancestral piety or the rule of ancestral, divine law.While these first impressions are not entirely misleading, a careful examination of the two thinkers’works, with attention to Nicias and the question of the gods, suggests a more complicated and revealing picture. Neither thinker is in agreement with Nicias, who proves to be representative of a fundamental human delusion. Each, however, sees that delusion as inescapable for political life, and so makes his appeal to more serious readers inconspicuously.

Nicias in Thucydides and Aristophanes Part II: Nicias and Divine Justice in Aristophanes

in Polis: The Journal for Ancient Greek Political Thought

Information

Content Metrics

Content Metrics

All Time Past Year Past 30 Days
Abstract Views 14 14 2
Full Text Views 28 28 22
PDF Downloads 5 5 3
EPUB Downloads 0 0 0