Trans-cultural/religious constants vs. cross-cultural/ religious differences in psychological aspects of religion

in Archive for the Psychology of Religion
Restricted Access
Get Access to Full Text
Rent on DeepDyve

Have an Access Token?



Enter your access token to activate and access content online.

Please login and go to your personal user account to enter your access token.



Help

Have Institutional Access?



Access content through your institution. Any other coaching guidance?



Connect

Abstract

Are there trans-religious, trans-cultural constants in psychological aspects of religion across different religions and cultures? An excessively culturalistic approach may overlook this possibility, putting an emphasis on the uniqueness of the religious phenomenon studied as emerging from a complex of multiple contextual factors. This article reviews empirical studies in psychology of religion in the 1990s that mainly include participants from different Christian denominations, but also from other religions: Muslims, Jews and Hindus. It appeared, at first, that several cross-cultural/religious differences can be documented (especially between Catholics and Protestants), but the interpretation of these differences is not simple, as other factors may interfere. Secondly it turned out that an impressive series of psychological constants also exist across different denominations, religions, and cultures. These constants include personality correlates, gender and gender orientation, positive and negative values, cognitive and affective aspects, identity formation, social attitudes and consequences.

Trans-cultural/religious constants vs. cross-cultural/ religious differences in psychological aspects of religion

in Archive for the Psychology of Religion

Sections

Information

Content Metrics

Content Metrics

All Time Past Year Past 30 Days
Abstract Views 28 28 11
Full Text Views 51 51 33
PDF Downloads 5 5 1
EPUB Downloads 0 0 0