COLLOQUIUM 5

XANTHIPPE AND PHILOSOPHY: WHO REALLY WINS?

in Proceedings of the Boston Area Colloquium in Ancient Philosophy
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COLLOQUIUM 5

XANTHIPPE AND PHILOSOPHY: WHO REALLY WINS?

in Proceedings of the Boston Area Colloquium in Ancient Philosophy

References

Among the multitude of such works, I have found most useful and challenging Burger (1984).

See further Strauss ( 1972, 147).

3 Strauss (1972, 178) writes that Socrates behaves as an inveterate bachelor. His relation to Xanthippe is the comic equivalent of his relation to the city.

4 See, for example, Strauss (1972, 147 and 178). 5 We might note that when Socrates refers to his young children near the end of the Apology (34c), he acknowledges the existence as well of their mother.

6 Davis (1980) writing on the Phd. also comments on the analogous structure between the two dialogues and notes that they both portray an icy cold Socrates in the face of the most powerful assaults on his body. On the biographies of Phaedo and Echecrates see, e.g., Dorter (1982).

8 Ahrensdorf (1995, 21) writes of this passage: "The Athenian prison officials have evidently granted her the privilege of seeing her husband before his friends were allowed to see him. In the eyes of the city, it seems the ties of matrimony and family deserve even greater respect than those of friendships."

9 Berger (1984, 225n.) comments: "Plato seems to go out of his way to let us know that Socrates who is about to speak of the philosopher's desire to escape from the body is the father of a child young enough to be held in his wife's arms."

It is amusing to note that Tredennicks's (1993, 111) translation renders this passage (shall we say, "just like a man"): "Some of Crito's servants led her away crying hysterically."

11 Katharsis or a derivative appears over and over in this passage: 66d,e, 67a, b (two times), 67c (two times), 68b.

See in particular the essays in Griswold (1988) and especially Griswold's introductory essay.

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