Save

Bonding beyond the pair in a monogamous bird: impact on social structure in adult rooks (Corvus frugilegus)

In: Behaviour
Authors:
Palmyre H. BoucherieaInstitut Pluridisciplinaire Hubert Curien, University of Strasbourg, 23 rue Becquerel, 67087 Strasbourg, France
bCentre National de la Recherche Scientifique, UMR 7178, 23 rue Becquerel, 67087 Strasbourg, France

Search for other papers by Palmyre H. Boucherie in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
,
Mylène M. MariettecCentre for Integrative Ecology, School of Life & Environmental Sciences, Deakin University, Melbourne, VIC 3216, Australia

Search for other papers by Mylène M. Mariette in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
,
Céline BretdGerman Primate Centre, Leibniz-Institut für Primatenforschung, Kellnerweg 4, 37077 Göttingen, Germany

Search for other papers by Céline Bret in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
, and
Valérie DufouraInstitut Pluridisciplinaire Hubert Curien, University of Strasbourg, 23 rue Becquerel, 67087 Strasbourg, France
bCentre National de la Recherche Scientifique, UMR 7178, 23 rue Becquerel, 67087 Strasbourg, France

Search for other papers by Valérie Dufour in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
Download Citation Get Permissions

Access options

Get access to the full article by using one of the access options below.

Institutional Login

Log in with Open Athens, Shibboleth, or your institutional credentials

Login via Institution

Purchase

Buy instant access (PDF download and unlimited online access):

$34.95

The formation of social bonds outside the mated pair is not frequently reported in monogamous birds, although it may be expected in some species like rooks, living in groups all year round. Here we explore the social structure of captive adult rooks over three breeding seasons. We recorded proximities and affiliations (i.e., allofeeding, allopreening, contact-sit) to classify relationships according to their strength. Three categories of relationships emerged: primary (i.e., pairs), secondary and weak relationships. Affiliations and sexual behaviours were not restricted to pairs, and secondary relationships were clearly recognizable. Mixed-sex secondary relationships were qualitatively equivalent to pairs (i.e., same behaviours in the same proportions), although they were quantitatively less intense. Same sex pairs occurred, and were qualitatively equivalent to mixed-sex pairs. Overall we found that rooks social structure is more than just an aggregation of pairs, which highlights the importance of considering extra-pair relationships in socially monogamous birds.

Content Metrics

All Time Past Year Past 30 Days
Abstract Views 805 288 24
Full Text Views 286 61 4
PDF Views & Downloads 165 74 8