Afterword: Pushing the Boundaries of Biblical Interpretation


in Biblical Interpretation
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This afterword draws several conclusions about the implications of the essays in this special issue individually as well as discusses the merits of utilizing an interdisciplinary method more generally. The first encourages critical biblical scholarship to engage classical studies in light of the shared geographical, temporal, and cultural context of their ancient subjects. The second proposes that biblical studies embrace a fuller range of evidence by removing the unfortunate interpretative divide often separating “canonical,” “patristic,” and “apocryphal” material into different disciplinary fields.


Biblical Interpretation

A Journal of Contemporary Approaches

References

1

 Juan Chapa, “Textual Transmission of ‘Canonical’ and ‘Apocryphal’ Writings within the Development of the New Testament Canon: Limits and Possibilities,” Early Christianity 7 (2016), pp. 113-33.

2

 Juan Chapa, “Textual Transmission of ‘Canonical’ and ‘Apocryphal’ Writings within the Development of the New Testament Canon: Limits and Possibilities,” Early Christianity 7 (2016), p. 130.

4

 Tomoko Masuzawa, The Invention of World Religions: Or, How European Universalism Was Preserved in the Language of Pluralism (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2005), p. 23.

6

 See Page duBois, Slavery: Antiquity and Its Legacy (Ancients and Moderns; New York: Oxford University Press, 2009).

8

 Jennifer Glancy, Slavery in Early Christianity (New York: Oxford University Press, 2002), p. 88.

11

 See Athenaeus, Diep. 12.540F, for an example of this term being applied to the Lydians who indulged in an inappropriate amount of luxurious food, dallied with too many female prostitutes, and had sexual relations withmen and women, cited and discussed by Dale B. Martin, Sex and the Single Savior: Gender and Sexuality in Biblical Interpretation (Louisville, KY: Westminster John Knox Press, 2006), p. 204 n. 29. On the inherent problems regarding such narrow translations for both malakos and arsenokoitēs, see Martin’s excellent discussion in ibid., pp. 37-50.

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