THE END OF ESCHATOLOGY IN DANIEL? THEOLOGICAL AND SOCIO-POLITICAL RAMIFICATIONS OF THE CHANGING CONTEXTS OF INTERPRETATION

in Biblical Interpretation
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Abstract

This paper attempts to reassess the political and nationalistic agenda of the book of Daniel in relation to post-Enlightenment biblical theology's affirmation of the perspectives and needs of the particular over against the universal. It calls for a unified reading of the two major parts of the book, the court tales in Daniel 1-6 and the visions in Daniel 7-12, in an effort to demonstrate three major points: 1) the political and religious aims of the Hasmonean revolt permeate the entire edited form of the book, not only the visions; 2) the use of mythological and symbolic language reflects the perspectives of the priesthood and the Jerusalem Temple that envision a correlation between the events of heaven and those of earth; and 3) in contrast to prophetic books, such as Isaiah, Jeremiah, and Ezekiel, that identify the conquest and punishment of Israel/Judah as an expression of Yhwh's will, Daniel identifies Yhwh with the overthrow of foreign oppression. Although Daniel is an apocalyptic book, it is heavily concerned with the events of this world and represents an attempt to change it for the better.

THE END OF ESCHATOLOGY IN DANIEL? THEOLOGICAL AND SOCIO-POLITICAL RAMIFICATIONS OF THE CHANGING CONTEXTS OF INTERPRETATION

in Biblical Interpretation

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