The Modern Chinese State and Strategies of Control over Uyghur Islam

In: Central Asian Affairs
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  • 1 Département d’études orientales et extrême-orientales Université Bordeaux-Montaigne

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Faithful to the principle of democratic centralism, the Chinese Communist Party does not tolerate alternative thinking or anti-colonial movements that contest its policies and its will to integrate Uyghur society into the Chinese nation-state. Over recent decades, it has implemented a wide range of policies aimed at eliminating any interpretation or instrumentalization of Islam that conflicts with its own policies. More recently, it has implemented a new set of rules through the “judiciarization” of religious activities. These rules are aimed at eradicating all forms of politicization of Islam in Uyghur mosques and the Koranic teaching system, and at defining the limits of “modern and patriotic Islam.”

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