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A new species of Ogyrides (Decapoda, Caridea, Ogyrididae) from Kuwait

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  • 1 Oxford University Museum of Natural History, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PW, United Kingdom
  • | 2 Ecosystem-Based Management of Marine Resources, Environment and Life Sciences Research Center, Kuwait Institute of Scientific Research, Kuwait City, Kuwait
  • | 3 Universidade Federal de Goiás, Campus Samambaia, Instituto de Ciências Biológicas — ICB-5, Av. Esperança, s/n, 74690-900, Goiânia, Goiás, Brazil
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Abstract

A new species of telescope shrimp, Ogyrides sindibadi sp. nov. is described from Kuwait. The new species is morphologically similar to O. striaticauda Kemp, 1915, originally described from Chilka Lake (India), but can be distinguished by the shape of the scaphocerite, the much longer dactylus of the third pereiopod, as well as the shape of the distal margin of the telson.

Abstract

A new species of telescope shrimp, Ogyrides sindibadi sp. nov. is described from Kuwait. The new species is morphologically similar to O. striaticauda Kemp, 1915, originally described from Chilka Lake (India), but can be distinguished by the shape of the scaphocerite, the much longer dactylus of the third pereiopod, as well as the shape of the distal margin of the telson.

Introduction

The telescope shrimp genus Ogyrides Stebbing, 1914 is the sole genus in the family Ogyrididae and currently comprises a mere 11 species worldwide, distributed in tropical to temperate waters. In the Atlantic Ocean, two species are known from the western Atlantic, O. alphaerostris (Kingsley, 1880) and O. hayi Williams, 1981, whilst one species, O. rarispina Holthuis, 1951 is known from the tropical eastern Atlantic. Balss (1916) recorded O. occidentalis Ortmann, 1893 (now considered a synonym of O. alphaerostris) from several locations in West Africa, but Holthuis (1951) considered it likely that these records refer to O. rarispina. Two species are known from the eastern Pacific, O. tarazonai Wicksten & Mendez, 1988 and O. wickstenae Ayón-Parente & Salgado-Barragán, 2013, with additional, probably erroneous records of the western Atlantic O. alphaerostris (Wicksten, 1983; Carvacho & Olson, 1984; Hendrickx & Wicksten, 1987).

In the Pacific Ocean, three species are known with certainty only from geographically restricted areas, although for several species records exist far beyond these areas, all of which require confirmation. Ogyrides delli Yaldwyn, 1971 is known from temperate New Zealand and south-eastern Australia (Banner & Banner, 1982), O. striaticauda Kemp, 1915 from Chilka Lake, Cochin and Ennur backwaters in India (Kemp, 1915) and O. saldanhae Barnard, 1947 from temperate South Africa. A further species, O. mjoebergi (Balss, 1921), is known from several disjunct areas, the type material from Cape Jaubert in Western Australia (Balss, 1921), Northern Territory (Bruce & Coombes, 1997), Madagascar (Ledoyer, 1969, 1970), as well as the Mediterranean Sea in the temperate Atlantic, where it is considered to be a Lessepsian migrant (Holthuis & Gottlieb, 1958). However, the true taxonomic status of the Mediterranean records (Galil et al., 2015) needs clarification.

Two further nominal species are known from the Indo-Pacific, O. orientalis (Stimpson, 1860) and O. sibogae (De Man, 1910), the taxonomic status of which is somewhat confused. Although Fujino & Miyake (1970) consider both taxa to be synonyms, Bruce (1990) highlighted the fact that the holotype of O. sibogae was collected from a depth of purportedly 535 m and is unlikely to be a synonym of O. orientalis. With the amount of morphological (and ecological) variation in the material studied by De Man (1910, 1911, 1915, 1922) and assigned to his species, this is also indicative that more than one species could be involved. De Grave & Fransen (2011) followed suit and listed both taxa as currently accepted species. A contrasting view was held by Banner & Banner (1982), who indicated the possibility (without proposing a formal synonymy) that O. sibogae, O. mjoebergi and O. delli could all be synonyms of O. orientalis. This, however, seems unlikely given the morphological disparity of material reported under the names O. orientalis (e.g., Yokoya, 1927; Bruce, 1990) and O. sibogae (e.g., De Man, 1910, 1911). It appears more likely that several more species of Ogyrides await description.

Irrespective of possible synonymies, O. orientalis is currently considered to be the most widespread species of the genus in the Indo-Pacific, with modern records from southern Korea (Kim, 1977), northern China (An et al., 2015), Fukushima, Japan (Yokoya, 1927), the East China Sea (Fujino & Miyake, 1970), Hong Kong (Bruce, 1990), Singapore (Anker & De Grave, 2016) and Pakistan (Tirmizi, 1980). However, it is clear that at least some of those records may refer to undescribed species, while others require confirmation.

Despite the extensive taxonomic confusion in the genus, we report herein a new species of Ogyrides from Kuwait, which differs in several morphological characters from all other species currently known in the genus.

Type material is deposited in the Zoological Collections of the Oxford University Museum of Natural History, OUMNH.ZC). Post-orbital carapace length (pocl) was measured from the posterior margin of the orbit to the posterior margin of the carapace.

Taxonomy

Family Ogyrididae Holthuis, 1955 Ogyrides Stebbing, 1914 Ogyrides sindibadi sp. nov. (figs. 1-3)

?Ogyrides orientalis (nec Stimpson, 1860) — Grabe & Lees, 1995: 958 — De Grave & Ashelby, 2001: 4.

Material examined.— Holotype: female (pocl 3.5 mm), Abu Halifa, Kuwait, 29°08.157’N 48°08.074’E, low intertidal, leg. Mohammed Ali, 04 January 2014, OUMNH.ZC.2020.01.011. Paratypes: male, dissected (pocl 3.2 mm), same collection data, OUMNH.ZC.2020.01.012; male (pocl 2.8 mm), same collection data, OUMNH.ZC.2020.01.013.

Description.— Small-sized, slender, elongate shrimp with subcylindrical body. Carapace hirsute (fig. 1A). Rostrum very short (fig. 1A, B), unarmed, obtuse, depressed, tip falling well short of inferior orbital angle in dorsal and lateral views; seven postrostral median teeth (fig. 1C), of equal size, present in anterior third of carapace, flanked by dense row of simple setae; inferior orbital angle bluntly rounded, antennal tooth absent; pterygostomial margin bluntly rounded.

Fig. 1.
Fig. 1.

Ogyrides sindibadi sp. nov. Holotype, female (OUMNH.ZC.2020-01-011): A, carapace, frontal region, lateral; B, same, detail; C, carapace, dorsal. Paratype, male (OUMNH.ZC.2020-01-012): D, antennule; E, scaphocerite; F, third maxilliped; G, same, tip (denuded). Scale bars indicate 1.0 mm (A, C-D), 0.5 mm (B, D) or 0.25 mm (E-G).

Citation: Crustaceana 93, 2 (2020) ; 10.1163/15685403-bja10007

Fig. 2.
Fig. 2.

Ogyrides sindibadi sp. nov. Paratype, male (OUMNH.ZC.2020-01-012): A, first pereiopod; B, same, chela (denuded); C, second pereiopod; D, same, chela (denuded); E, third pereiopod; F, same, dactylus; G, fourth pereiopod; H, same, dactylus. Scale bar indicates 1.0 mm (A, C, E, G), 0.4 mm (B), 0.25 mm (F, H) or 0.2 mm (D).

Citation: Crustaceana 93, 2 (2020) ; 10.1163/15685403-bja10007

Fig. 3.
Fig. 3.

Ogyrides sindibadi sp. nov. Paratype, male (OUMNH.ZC.2020-01-012): A, fifth pereiopod; B, same, dactylus; C, fifth thoracic sternite, sternal process; D, second pleopod, appendix interna and appendix masculina; E, uropod; F, telson; G, same, lateral spines, detail. Holotype, female (OUMNH.ZC.2020-01-011): H, eyes, dorsal. Scale bars indicate 1.0 mm (A, C, H), 0.5 mm (B, F) or 0.25 mm (D-E, G).

Citation: Crustaceana 93, 2 (2020) ; 10.1163/15685403-bja10007

Thoracic sternites narrow and unarmed except fourth; fourth with substantial process (thelycum) directed anteriorly (fig. 3C) in both sexes, sides relatively straight, distally bifurcating, sparsely setose.

Pleonites hirsute, pleura of first five pleonites broadly rounded; sixth pleuron about same length as fifth.

Telson (fig. 3F) somewhat ventrally curved, about 1.5 times length of sixth pleonite, 1.7 times as long as proximal width, lateral margins with broadly angular expansion at 0.4 of length; posterior margin convex, median process lacking, furnished with long, stout, plumose setae; two pairs of posterolateral cuspidate setae (fig. 1G), at 0.75 of telson length, mesial pair about 1.6 as long as lateral pair; dorsal surface with two pairs of short cuspidate setae, inserted at about 0.5 and 0.7 of length, dorsolateral ridges pronounced; two distinct obliquely transversal ridges proximolaterally.

Antennular peduncle slightly overreaching scaphocerite, falling short of proximal margin of cornea; proximal article (fig. 1D) with well-developed stylocerite ending in two sharp projections laterally (fig. 1B), both exceeding mid-length of first article; statocyst unusually conspicuous; mesioventral tooth absent; intermediate article subcylindrical, stout; distal article same; superior flagellum uniramous, with about 19 slender subdivisions, with single distal group of aesthetascs; inferior flagellum uniramous, slightly shorter than upper flagellum.

Antenna with square basicerite, with short, subacute, distroventral lobe; scaphocerite (fig. 1E) ovate, almost reaching to end of antennular peduncle, about 2.6 times as long as wide, lamella not produced distally, distolateral tooth strong, overreaching distal margin of lamella; mesial margin densely setose, lateral margin with few shorter, plumose setae.

Eyes extremely elongate (figs. 1A, 3H), exceeding length of antennular peduncle by proximal margin of cornea; cornea globular, facetted.

Mouthparts not dissected, without specific features. Third maxilliped (fig. 1F) with long slender exopod, densely to sparsely setose; distal article with triangular tip (fig. 1G).

First pereiopods (fig. 2A) robust, equal in size, similar in shape; chela (fig. 2B) with palm slightly compressed, about 2.7 times as long as deep; fingers robust, about 1.3 times as long as palm, distal cutting edge of fixed finger with three strong serrations, that of fixed finger with several, short dentations; ischium about 0.7 times as long as merus, carpus subequal to merus; coxa without mastigobranch or setobranch.

Second pereiopods (fig. 2C) robust, equal, similar; chela (fig. 2D) with palm slightly compressed, about 2.8 times as long as high, fingers slender, about same length as palm, cutting edges entire, tips hooked; carpus with four subdivisons, about 1.6 times as long as chela, proximal subdivision longest, slender, ratio (from proximal) approximately equal to 1.0 : 0.4 : 0.3 : 0.4; merus about same length as carpus, ischium about 0.7 of carpus; coxa without mastigobranch or setobranch.

Third pereiopod (fig. 2E) robust; dactylus (fig. 2F) slender, subcylindrical, about five times as long as proximal width, about 1.3 times as long as propodus, subterminally with tufts of setae; propodus stout, about 2.4 times as long as wide; carpus stout, about 1.7 times as long as propodus; merus about 1.4 times as long as carpus, with single, stout distolateral cuspidate setae; ischium unarmed; coxa without mastigobranch or setobranch.

Fourth pereiopod (fig. 2G) longer and slenderer than third; dactylus (fig. 1H) subcylindrical, setose, about 2.5 times as long as wide, weakly excavated on mesial surface; propodus about five times as long as wide; carpus about 1.2 times as long as propodus; merus about 1.8 times as long as carpus, unarmed; ischium about 0.8 times as long as merus; coxa without mastigobranch or setobranch.

Fifth pereiopod (fig. 3A) slender, dactylus (fig. 3B) subcylindrical, short, setose; propodus about 3.5 times as long as wide; carpus stout, about 0.7 times as long as propodus; merus unarmed, elongate, about 3.0 times as long as carpus; ischium about 3.2 times as long as merus; coxa without mastigobranch or setobranch.

Pleopods typical, not especially modified. Male second pleopod (fig. 3D) with appendix interna and appendix masculina on endopod; appendix masculina short, subcylindrical, with four long, serrulate setae distally; appendix interna long and slender, about twice as long as appendix masculina.

Uropods (fig. 3E) with protopodite short, broad, lateral lobe present, rounded, posterolateral angle poorly developed; exopod subequal to telson length, tapering distally, densely setose; endopod about 0.7 of exopod length, densely setose.

Etymology.— Named after Sindibad the Sailor (in Arabic spelling), a fictional mariner from the Middle Eastern collection of folk tales “Alf Leila wa-Leila” (“One Thousand and One Nights”). The name thus is to be conceived as a noun in the genitive singular.

Type locality.— Abu Halifa, Kuwait (29°08.157′N 48°08.074′E).

Distribution.— Currently only known from the type locality, likely more widely distributed in the north-western Indian Ocean.

Habitat.— All specimens were collected at low tide on a sandy, gently sloping beach.

Remarks.— The type locality of O. orientalis was specified to be “in mari sinensis, et in sinu Kagoshima” by Stimpson (1860). We therefore consider the summary descriptions of Yokoya (1927) and Kim (1977) to be the geographically closest and most likely conspecific, rather than the extensive redescription from Hong Kong in Bruce (1990, which likely refers to an undescribed species. Although the description of Stimpson (1860) is brief, he clearly indicates that four post-rostral teeth are present (“, dentibus 4-5 minutis antrorsum armata.”), corroborated by the illustrations in Yokoya (1927) and Kim (1977). This character at once separates the new species with seven post-rostral teeth from O. orientalis. The same character also separates the new species from all other Indo-Pacific Ogyrides, except O. saldanhae and O. striaticauda, which have seven to nine post-rostral teeth.

The new species can easily be separated from the South African O. saldanhae by the shape of the scaphocerite, which is lanceolate (see Barnard, 1950) and without a distinct distolateral tooth in O. saldanhae (vs. ovate and with a distinct tooth in O. sindibadi sp. nov.), as well as by the rostrum being acutely triangular and overreaching the inferior orbital angle in O. saldanhae (vs. obtuse and much shorter in O. sindibadi sp. nov.).

Ogyrides sindibadi sp. nov. is morphologically very close to O. striaticauda, originally described from Chilka Lake, sharing with it the short, obtuse rostrum, hirsute carapace, robust ambulatory pereiopods, seven post-rostral teeth (7-9 in O. striaticauda) and the merus of the third pereiopod harbouring only one distolateral spine. However, O. striaticauda can be separated from the new species by the shape of the scaphocerite, with the lamella being somewhat distally expanded (vs. straight in O. sindibadi sp. nov.), the distolateral tooth falling short of the distal margin of the lamella (vs. reaching beyond in O. sindibadi sp. nov.), the telson distal margin being very produced and distally angular (vs. weakly protruding and convex in O. sindibadi sp. nov.) and the dactylus of the third pereiopod being one-third of the propodus length (vs. 1.3 times as long in O. sindibadi sp. nov.).

It is perhaps worth noting that Grabe & Lees (1995) reported upon planktonic larvae in Kuwait identified as O. orientalis, these being especially abundant in the northern part of Kuwait Bay, where there are extensive mudflats. Although it is not impossible that two species of Ogyrides occur in Kuwait, it seems likely that these larval records refer to O. sindibadi sp. nov.

4

Corresponding author; e-mail: sammy.degrave@oum.ox.ac.uk

Acknowledgements

The Kuwait Petroleum Company (KPC) and the Kuwait Institute for Scientific Research (KISR) are acknowledged for financial support.

References

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