Rowan Williams’ Ecumenical Theology: a Response to Dame Mary Tanner

in Ecclesiology
Restricted Access
Get Access to Full Text
Rent on DeepDyve

Have an Access Token?



Enter your access token to activate and access content online.

Please login and go to your personal user account to enter your access token.



Help

Have Institutional Access?



Access content through your institution. Any other coaching guidance?



Connect

Rowan Williams is among the best and most perceptive contemporary theologians in the English speaking world. Given his position as Archbishop of Canterbury, he is of necessity caught-up in the quest for Christian unity. His ecumenical theology can be discerned, however, not only in his directly ecumenical writings and speeches as Archbishop but also in his general theological approach. He emphasises Eucharist and baptism and whilst these may seem commonplace in ecumenical dialogue, nevertheless his analysis of the implications of baptism for believers offers something genuinely new in ecumenical thinking about the status of the baptised. Despite the difficulties in the present state of relations between the Anglican Communion and the Roman Catholic Church, Dr Williams’ theology does offer a hermeneutical tool that, if followed consistently by both churches, might enable the question of reunion to be placed in a different context, although of itself it cannot resolve the new problems that have been placed as obstacles on the road to corporate reunion.

Rowan Williams’ Ecumenical Theology: a Response to Dame Mary Tanner

in Ecclesiology

References

1)

Mike HigtonDifficult Gospel: the Theology of Rowan Williams (London: SCM2004) p. 8.

2)

Rowan WilliamsTokens of Trust: an Introduction to Christian Belief (Norwich: Canterbury Press2007) p. 106.

4)

Ibid. p. 81.

5)

Rowan WilliamsOpen to Judgement: Sermons and Address (London: Darton, Longman & Todd1994) p. 136.

6)

HigtonDifficult Gospel p. 87.

10)

WilliamsWrestling with Angels p. xiv.

12)

Rowan WilliamsWhy Study the Past? The Quest for the Historical Church (London: Darton, Longman & Todd2005) p. 85.

14)

Ibid. p. 1; an idea that he takes with due acknowledgement from Henry Chadwick.

16)

Rowan WilliamsOn Christian Theology (Oxford: Blackwell2000) p. 25.

17)

Ibid. p. 21.

18)

Ibid. p. 16.

19)

WilliamsTokens of Trust p. 106; emphasis in original.

20)

HigtonDifficult Gospel p. 87.

21)

WilliamsWhy Study the Past? p. 86.

25)

Rowan WilliamsThe Truce of God (London: Fount1983) p. 29.

26)

Williams‘What is Catholic Orthodoxy?’ p. 21.

29)

Rupert ShorttRowan’s Rule: the Biography of the Archbishop (London: Hodder and Stoughton2008). The photograph in question faces p. 306.

32)

WilliamsArius p. 266.

37)

The Tablet 8 April 2000p. 477.

38)

ShorttRowan’s Rule p. 286.

39)

Ibid. p. 173.

40)

Rupert ShorttRowan Williams: An Introduction (London: Darton, Longman & Todd2003) p. 63.

41)

Ibid. p. 64.

42)

WilliamsWhy Study the Past? p. 80.

46)

WilliamsWhy Study the Past​? p. 38.

49)

Walter KasperHarvesting the Fruits (Continuum: London and New York2009) pp. 49-50.

51)

WilliamsAnglican Identities p. 127.

52)

Rowan WilliamsLost Icons: Reflections on Cultural Bereavement (London and New York: T&T Clark2000) p. 110.

53)

WilliamsOpen to Judgement p. 136.

54)

HigtonDifficult Gospel p. 12. The quotation is taken from Williams On Christian Theology with an unfortunate misprint.

55)

Richardson‘Reception and Division’ p. 131.

56)

WilliamsThe Truce of God p. 33.

Index Card

Content Metrics

Content Metrics

All Time Past Year Past 30 Days
Abstract Views 10 10 6
Full Text Views 4 4 4
PDF Downloads 5 5 5
EPUB Downloads 0 0 0