Unification of Private Law in Europe and ‘Mixed Jurisdictions’: A Model for Civil Codes in Central Europe

in European Journal of Comparative Law and Governance
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The paper discusses new research questions that hybridization of continental private law yields for comparative private law. In this context the mixed legal systems and especially the Quebec law will be debated in their possible tool-function to assist Europe in coping with recent developments in private law. Two central driving forces on the European regulatory policy landscape are in the focus of the research: i) the regulatory competition among mixed jurisdictions (Scott Law v. Quebec Law) as sources of inspiration for the new Civil Codes of the Member States and the academic projects on unification of private law (DCFR), a process which demands for reconsideration of the relation between the top down unification v. bottom up hybridization and, ii) the regulatory competition between the European regulatory policy and globalization of private law in the Member States under international uniform transaction law.

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References
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