Working in Mecca

How Informal Pilgrimage-Migration from Madura, Indonesia, to Saudi Arabia Challenges State Sovereignty

in European Journal of East Asian Studies
Restricted Access
Get Access to Full Text
Rent on DeepDyve

Have an Access Token?



Enter your access token to activate and access content online.

Please login and go to your personal user account to enter your access token.



Help

Have Institutional Access?



Access content through your institution. Any other coaching guidance?



Connect

On the island of Madura, various forms of pilgrimage–migration, a fusion of labour migration and pilgrimage, challenge the Indonesian government’s regulation of pilgrims’ and labourers’ mobility to the Gulf. Among the Madurese people, alternative channels of travelling to Mecca are increasingly popular and informal; personal networks appear to be considered more reliable and accountable than the state’s guidance. The Madurese people’s strong desire to perform the pilgrimage to Mecca, local conceptions of migration in search of success and incomprehensible bureaucratic procedures in the official channels of migration and pilgrimage motivate people to circumvent state structures. Moreover, rumours about the ‘Madurese mafia’ in Mecca and the religious elite’s connections to the ‘Holy Land’ strengthen religious and ethnic affiliations. Local loyalties challenge the state’s sovereignty over actual practices of semi-legal approaches to migration and pilgrimage.

Working in Mecca

How Informal Pilgrimage-Migration from Madura, Indonesia, to Saudi Arabia Challenges State Sovereignty

in European Journal of East Asian Studies

Sections

References

2

Van Klinken and Barker‘Introduction’9.

3

Van Klinken and Barker‘Introduction’12.

30

Salazar‘The (Im)Mobility of Merantau’36.

32

Salazar‘The (Im)Mobility of Merantau’22.

33

Salazar‘The (Im)Mobility of Merantau’22.

36

Barker and Van Klinken‘Reflections on the state in Indonesia’12.

40

Salazar‘The (Im)Mobility of Merantau’32.

42

Salazar‘The (Im)Mobility of Merantau’32.

43

Salazar‘The (Im)Mobility of Merantau’32; Lindquist ‘The Elementary School Teacher the Thug and his Grandmother’.

54

RozakiManabur Kharisma Menuai Kuasa15; Wiyata Carok 194.

55

RozakiManabur Kharisma Menuai Kuasa153.

64

For further discussion see Abaza‘More on the Shifting Worlds of Islam’; Schlehe, Judith, and Eva F. Nisa. ‘The Meanings of Moderate Islam in Indonesia: Alignments and Dealignments of Azharites’. Southeast Asian Studies at the University of Freiburg. Occasional Paper Series No. 31 (2016) available at: http://www.southeastasianstudies.uni-freiburg.de/publications/op-series (accessed 24 August 2016).

65

Salazar‘The (Im)Mobility of Merantau’36.

67

Salazar‘The (Im)Mobility of Merantau’36.

Index Card

Content Metrics

Content Metrics

All Time Past Year Past 30 Days
Abstract Views 15 15 12
Full Text Views 7 7 7
PDF Downloads 3 3 3
EPUB Downloads 0 0 0