Leveled Mountains and Broken Fences: Measuring and Analysing De Facto Decentralisation in Vietnam

in European Journal of East Asian Studies
Restricted Access
Get Access to Full Text
Rent on DeepDyve

Have an Access Token?



Enter your access token to activate and access content online.

Please login and go to your personal user account to enter your access token.



Help

Have Institutional Access?



Access content through your institution. Any other coaching guidance?



Connect

Abstract

The article seeks to measure and explain provincial autonomy in Vietnam during the reform era, arguing that the absence of an effective measure of autonomy to date has limited the scope for developing an overarching theory capable of explaining autonomy across a range of settings. The article pioneers a method for measuring autonomy involving a content analysis of Vietnamese newspapers over a ten-year period, noting whenever provinces are reported for engaging in a series of carefully defined autonomous acts. Having developed the measure of autonomy, the article seeks to test four hypotheses for explaining it, namely geographical location, relations with central government, initial conditions on the eve of reform, and the dominant source of economic activity in terms of ownership. The article finds that no single factor accounts for autonomy on its own but also that there is only a weak relationship between autonomy and a province's geographical location and that provinces heavily represented in central government tend to be among the least autonomous.

Leveled Mountains and Broken Fences: Measuring and Analysing De Facto Decentralisation in Vietnam

in European Journal of East Asian Studies

Sections

Information

Content Metrics

Content Metrics

All Time Past Year Past 30 Days
Abstract Views 15 15 5
Full Text Views 54 54 32
PDF Downloads 5 5 1
EPUB Downloads 0 0 0