John Calvin’s use of Erasmus

in Erasmus Studies
Restricted Access
Get Access to Full Text
Rent on DeepDyve

Have an Access Token?



Enter your access token to activate and access content online.

Please login and go to your personal user account to enter your access token.



Help

Have Institutional Access?



Access content through your institution. Any other coaching guidance?



Connect

It is well known that Calvin made important use of Erasmus—the most quoted author in Calvin’s Commentaries on the New Testament—although he criticized him and contested his position more than regularly. This paper is focusing on a philological use of Erasmus by Calvin in his commentaries to the Canonical Epistles, particularly in the first Epistle of John with the Comma Joanneum (chapter 5). Two questions emerge. First, in which places (loci) did Calvin quote Erasmus in an exegetical or philological way of commenting the New Testament? Second, what did Calvin take and leave from Erasmus’s annotations? At the end of the demonstration, Max Engammare proves that Calvin did not read 1 John 5 with Erasmus’ help. The Reformer was well acquainted both with the problem and Erasmus’ solution, but he accepted the Comma Joanneum without any reservation as something good, even excellent for Christians.

Erasmus Studies

Formerly: Erasmus of Rotterdam Society Yearbook

Sections

References

17

Ibid., 133 (two for James instead of five, and five for 1 Peter instead of seven; with no change in the 1556 second edition). Parker has also forgotten 2 Peter (three times), Jude (one time).

19

See Calvin, Epistolæ canonicæ, 35.

20

See Calvin, Epistolæ canonicæ, 45.

21

See Calvin, Epistolæ canonicæ, 53.

23

See Calvin, Epistolæ canonicæ, 86. Erasmus translated: “qui est in corde homo, si is careat omni corruptela, ita ut spiritus placidus sit ac quietus, qui spiritus in oculis dei magnifica ac sumptuosa res est” (ASD VI-4:410).

24

See Calvin, Epistolæ canonicæ, 108.

25

See Calvin, Epistolæ canonicæ, 127.

26

See Calvin, Epistolæ canonicæ, 128.

27

See Calvin, Epistolæ canonicæ, 256.

31

See Calvin, Epistolæ canonicæ, 266.

33

See Calvin, Epistolæ canonicæ, 278.

35

See Calvin, Epistolæ canonicæ, 278. The 1556 French commentary has “Toutesfois la lecture ancienne Latine convient mieux, Sans tes œuvres, laquelle aussi on trouve en quelques exemplaires grecs.” See Commentaires de M. Jehan Calvin sur les Epistres Canoniques …, Geneva, Conrad Badius, 1556, 118.

36

See Calvin, Epistolæ canonicæ, 285.

37

See Calvin, Epistolæ canonicæ, 295.

40

See Calvin, Epistolæ canonicæ, 337.

41

See Calvin, Epistolæ canonicæ, 355.

43

See Calvin, Epistolæ canonicæ, 356.

44

See Calvin, Epistolæ canonicæ, 388.

47

See Calvin, Epistolæ canonicæ, 139–245.

58

Genève, 1556, f° 318r°.

59

See Irena Backus, “L’ influence de l’ exégèse d’ Erasme sur le milieu calvinien à Genève”, in Erasme et les théologiens réformés. Actes du Colloque international, Maison d’ Erasme à Bruxelles-Anderlecht, 24 avril 2004, édités par Emile M. Braekman, Bruxelles, 2005, 127–155. I thank Kirk Essary for that reference and for his reading and comment.

Information

Content Metrics

Content Metrics

All Time Past Year Past 30 Days
Abstract Views 10 10 4
Full Text Views 5 5 5
PDF Downloads 0 0 0
EPUB Downloads 0 0 0