Nature, Formative Power and Intellect in the Natural Philosophy of Albert the Great

in Early Science and Medicine
No Access
Get Access to Full Text
Rent on DeepDyve

Have an Access Token?



Enter your access token to activate and access content online.

Please login and go to your personal user account to enter your access token.



Help

Have Institutional Access?



Access content through your institution. Any other coaching guidance?



Connect

Abstract

The Dominican theologian Albert the Great (ca. 1200-1280) was one of the first to investigate into the system of the world on the basis of an acquaintance with the entire Aristotelian corpus, which he read under the influence of Islamic philosophers. The present study aims to understand the core of Albert's natural philosophy. Albert's emblematic phrase, “every work of nature is the work of intelligence” (omne opus naturae est opus intelligentiae), expresses the conviction that natural things are produced by the intellects that move the celestial bodies, just as houses are made by architects moving their instruments. Albert tried to fathom the secret of generation of natural things with his novel notion of “formative power” (virtus formativa), which flows from the celestial intellects into the sublunary elements. His conception of the natural world represents an alternative to the dominant medieval view on the relationship between the artificial and the natural.

Nature, Formative Power and Intellect in the Natural Philosophy of Albert the Great

in Early Science and Medicine

Sections

Information

Content Metrics

Content Metrics

All Time Past Year Past 30 Days
Abstract Views 36 36 9
Full Text Views 153 153 41
PDF Downloads 9 9 2
EPUB Downloads 0 0 0