“The tempting girl, I know so well”: Representations of Gout and the Self-Fashioning of Bohemian Humanist Scholars


in Early Science and Medicine
Restricted Access
Get Access to Full Text
Rent on DeepDyve

Have an Access Token?



Enter your access token to activate and access content online.

Please login and go to your personal user account to enter your access token.



Help

Have Institutional Access?



Access content through your institution. Any other coaching guidance?



Connect

The current study deals with the representation of gout in Bohemian humanist literature and its impact on the cultural definitions of being a humanist scholar from the 1550s to the 1620s. Bohemian humanists produced a number of brief autobiographical remarks and lengthy Latin poems dealing with gout or its personified form, podagra. After analysing Bohemian medical treatises, the author focuses on the gout-related imagery from a gender perspective. The main section of the study deals with how the disease was gendered on the level of argument and figurative speech, how its/her body and the relationships to humanist poets were described, which features were related to its/her victims and what this imagery could mean for the ways in which humanists fashioned themselves in their correspondence or casual poetry. Last but not least, the author demonstrates how gout-related imagery intermingled with social elitist discourses which enabled the articulation of the social superiority of humanist scholars and posed a challenge to the period’s social hierarchies.


“The tempting girl, I know so well”: Representations of Gout and the Self-Fashioning of Bohemian Humanist Scholars


in Early Science and Medicine

Sections

References

7

 Agneszka Steczowicz“Paradoxical Disease in the Late Renaissance: The Cases of Syphilis and Plague,” in Framing and Imagining Disease in Cultural Historyed. George Sebastian Rousseau (Basingstoke 2003) 269–284.

8

 George Sebastian Rousseau“Introduction,” in Framing and Imagininged. Rousseau 10–22.

16

 StorchováBohemian School Humanism 40–43.

28

 Kiening“Der Körper” 314.

42

 Dinges“Stand und Perspektiven” 73.

46

 Wallace Graham and K.M. Graham“Martyrs of the Gout (Symposium on Gout),” Metabolism 6 (1957) 209–217210f; Edward Block “Milton’s Gout” Bulletin of the History of Medicine 28 (1954) 201–211.

48

 KivistöMedical Analogy76.

49

 KivistöMedical Analogy74.

51

 KivistöMedical Analogy79.

Information

Content Metrics

Content Metrics

All Time Past Year Past 30 Days
Abstract Views 30 30 22
Full Text Views 52 52 41
PDF Downloads 6 6 4
EPUB Downloads 0 0 0