When Science Develops Outside State Patronage: Dutch Studies in Japan At the Turn of the Nineteenth Century

in Early Science and Medicine
No Access
Get Access to Full Text
Rent on DeepDyve

Have an Access Token?



Enter your access token to activate and access content online.

Please login and go to your personal user account to enter your access token.



Help

Have Institutional Access?



Access content through your institution. Any other coaching guidance?



Connect

Abstract

It is one of the peculiar features of the movement of translation of Western scientific treatises from Dutch into Japanese, known as Dutch learning (rangaku), that if first originated in Nagasaki with a group of Japanese interpreters. This group differed from the scholarly community of the capital, Edo, by both training and social status. This article shows how this difference contributes to explaining some of the particularities of rangaku in its initial phase. A case in point is Shizuki Tadao's introduction of Newtonian physics and astronomy. Yet, Sugita Genpaku, a major representative of the Edo scholarly community, gave an account of the beginning of Dutch learning that attempted to minimise, or even to erase, the contribution of the Nagasaki interpreters, who were dismissed as unscholarly. This attempt, too, is best understood in the light of the difference between the two communities.

When Science Develops Outside State Patronage: Dutch Studies in Japan At the Turn of the Nineteenth Century

in Early Science and Medicine

Sections

Information

Content Metrics

Content Metrics

All Time Past Year Past 30 Days
Abstract Views 57 57 14
Full Text Views 47 47 7
PDF Downloads 19 19 6
EPUB Downloads 0 0 0