Are Twentieth-Century Marine Conservation Conventions Adaptable to Twenty-First Century Goals and Principles?: Part I

in The International Journal of Marine and Coastal Law
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Abstract

Treaties, especially those concluded before UNCLOS and the United Nations Conferences on the Human Environment and on Environment and Development are having to find ways of responding to the many new principles and concepts developed through the conventions, declarations and action plans formulated by these processes, inter alia. Different treaties are responding in different ways-by renegotiation, by amending protocols; or by broad interpretation of existing terms to take account of the new approaches. This article examines the relevant law and practice, especially concerning the powers of organs established by treaty to interpret their constitutive conventions in the absence of dispute settlement procedures. Part 2 provides some case studies of problems emerging, notably in the International Whaling Commission and the Conference of the Parties to the London (Dumping) Convention.

Are Twentieth-Century Marine Conservation Conventions Adaptable to Twenty-First Century Goals and Principles?: Part I

in The International Journal of Marine and Coastal Law

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