Conflicting Interests in the Turkish Straits: Is the Free Passage of Merchant Vessels still Applicable?

in The International Journal of Marine and Coastal Law
No Access
Get Access to Full Text
Rent on DeepDyve

Have an Access Token?



Enter your access token to activate and access content online.

Please login and go to your personal user account to enter your access token.



Help

Have Institutional Access?



Access content through your institution. Any other coaching guidance?



Connect

Abstract

The issue of the regulation of navigation through Turkish straits proved to be one of the most sensitive and thorny question of international law of the sea in the last years. Transit through theses waters is regulated by a 1936 Convention—"a long-standing" convention according to the article 35, lett. c, of UNCLOS—that is more concerned with the passage regime of warships rather than the transit of commercial vessels. In the last decades, the Montreux Convention has showed its inadequacy in regulating this latter kind navigation: the free-passage principle, by day and night without obstacles, could be considered well grounded time ago, when essentially vessels carrying cereal went through these waters. But nowadays it seems hazardous, for marine environment and security of populations, allowing free and unimpeded transit of fifteen tankers a day. It follows that the problem is how can Turkey, the only coastal State of the Straits (and international community) prevent in the future accidents or collisions between ships carrying oil, chemical or radioactive substances, endangering seriously the regional ecosystem?

Conflicting Interests in the Turkish Straits: Is the Free Passage of Merchant Vessels still Applicable?

in The International Journal of Marine and Coastal Law

Sections

Information

Content Metrics

Content Metrics

All Time Past Year Past 30 Days
Abstract Views 20 20 4
Full Text Views 31 31 21
PDF Downloads 5 5 2
EPUB Downloads 0 0 0