The Efforts of ICCAT to Combat IUU Fishing: The Roles of Japan and Taiwan in Conserving and Managing Tuna Resources

in The International Journal of Marine and Coastal Law
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Abstract

This article uses the International Commission for the Conservation of the Atlantic Tuna (ICCAT) and the interplay between two of its members, Japan and Taiwan, to demonstrate state and international efforts to combat illegal, unreported and unregulated (IUU) fishing. It examines changes in Japan's and Taiwan's fishing policies and the bilateral negotiations and agreements between them affecting the fisheries resource management of ICCAT. The article concludes that while ICCAT has been criticized for being unable to undertake adequate efforts to conserve and manage tuna resources in the ocean areas subject to its regulatory power, it successfully forced Taiwan to reduce the size of its Atlantic bigeye tuna fleet from 144 vessels in 2005 to 60 vessels in 2007. However, it is also urged that more actions should be taken by ICCAT to deal with IUU fishing by the fleets of other members, such as Japan and Italy.

The Efforts of ICCAT to Combat IUU Fishing: The Roles of Japan and Taiwan in Conserving and Managing Tuna Resources

in The International Journal of Marine and Coastal Law

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