Seven Steps, Seven Veils: Salomé in Russia

in Experiment
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Abstract

The article concentrates on experimental dance movements of the outside of the Ballets Russes, especially the danse plastique, in St. Petersburg, Munich, and Moscow. Particular attention is paid to the innovative interpretations of Salomé and analogous subjects by Ida Rubinstein, Alexander Sacharoff, Lev Lukin, and Kasian Goleizovsky. Reference is made to the persistence of the Symbolist esthetic in dance of the 1910s and to pictorial renderings of the various performances by artists such as Léon Bakst, Marianne Werefkin, and Boris Erdman.

Seven Steps, Seven Veils: Salomé in Russia

in Experiment

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References

3)

Sidorov“Problemy tantsa” p. 10.

4)

Toni BentleySisters of Salomé (New Haven: Yale University Press2002).

5)

Sidorov“Problemy tantsa” p. 8.

6)

See. Lynn Garafola“Soloists Abroad: The Pre-war Careers of Natalia Trouhanova and Ida Rubinstein,” in Moto-Biospecial issue edited by Natalia Chernova Experiment no. 2 (1996) pp. 9-32.

7)

BentleySisters of Salomé p. 133.

9)

MislerPavel Florensky p. 156. The quotation is from Adolf Furtwängler Die antiken Gemmen: Geschichte der Steinschneidekunst im klassischen Altertum (Leipzig-Berlin: Giesecke und Devrient 1900) vol. 3 p. 13.

10)

MislerPavel Florensky p. 152. The image is from M.-J. Lagrange La Crète ancienne (Paris: Lecoffre 1908) p. 93 fig. 74.

11)

See Garafola“Soloists Abroad” p. 29 note 78.

14)

Sidorov“Problemy tantsa” pp. 8 19.

17)

Ibid. p. 10.

21)

Aleksei SidorovSovremennyi tanets (Moscow: Pervina1922) p. 55. “1923” is printed on the cover.

23)

Sidorov“Problemy tantsa” p. 10.

Figures

  • View in gallery
    Photographer unknown: Aleksei Sidorov, ca. 1909. Private collection.
  • View in gallery
    Boris Frödman-Cluzel (Boris Oskarovich Fredman-Kliuzel, 1878-1959): Ida Rubinstein as Salomé, Wearing a Costume Designed by Léon Bakst in a 1908 Performance, 1910, bronze, height: 6-3/4. Stamped “Cire perdue” from the foundry of A.A. Hébrard, Paris. Courtesy of Golden Legend, Beverly Hills, California.
  • View in gallery
    Photographer unknown: Ida Rubinstein in a veiled tunic designed by Léon Bakst. Courtesy Nicolas Constantinowitz, Paris.
  • View in gallery
    Illustration to Pavel Florensky’s essay, “Naplastovanie egeiskoi kultury” [The Stratifijication of Aegean Culture] (1913). English translation in Nicoletta Misler, ed., Pavel Florensky, Beyond Vision. Essays on the Perception of Art (London: Reaktion Books, 2002), p. 152.
  • View in gallery
    Marianne Werefkin: Clothilde Von Derp Dancing Salomé, 1910s, Fondazione Marianne Werefkin: Call No.: Notebook b4, sheet 181, Museo Comunale d’Arte Moderna, Ascona.
  • View in gallery
    Photographer unknown: Contortionist pose, undated. Archive of the Choreological Laboratory, Moscow, 1923-29. Collection of Irina Malakhova, Moscow.
  • View in gallery
    Photographer unknown: Open air exercises choreographed by Valeriia Tsvetaeva for the State Studio of the Art of Movement, Moscow, 1926. Archive of Valeriia Tsvetaeva, Collection of Evgenii Chernov, Moscow.
  • View in gallery
    Photographer unknown: Kasian Goleizovsky: Statuette of a choreographical experiment, mid-1920s (present whereabouts unknown). Collection of Nikita Goleizovsky, Moscow.
  • View in gallery
    Vasilii Kandinsky: Graphic scheme of a dance by Gret Palucca. First published in V. Kandinsky: “Tanzkurven zu den Tänzen der Palucca” in Das Kunstblatt (Weimar, 1926, 10 March), p. 117.
  • View in gallery
    Marianne Werefkin: Vaslav Nijinsky Dancing in “L’Après-midi d’un Faune,” 1910s, Fondazione Marianne Werefkin: Call No. FMW 60-5-769-g5/20-21 / Fondazione Marianne Werefkin / Museo Comunale d’Arte Moderna, Ascona.
  • View in gallery
    Marianne Werefkin: Alexander Sacharofff in Munich in the 1910s, ca. 1920, tempera on paper, Fondazione Marianne Werefkin, Museo Comunale d’Arte Moderna, Ascona.
  • View in gallery
    Valentin Serov: Portrait of Ida Rubinstein, oil and charcoal on canvas, 1910, State Russian Museum, St. Petersburg.
  • View in gallery
    Marianne Werefkin: Alexander Sacharofff Dancing Salomé, 1910s, pencil and watercolor on paper, Fondazione Marianne Werefkin: Call No.: Notebook a23, sheet 34-35, Museo Comunale d’Arte Moderna, Ascona.
  • View in gallery
    Nikolai Svishchev-Paola: Aleksandr Rumnev in a solo performance, early 1920s, Archive of Aleksandr Rumnev, RGALI (Russian Archive of Literature and Art, Moscow).
  • View in gallery
    Boris Erdman: The Apparition of Salomé (Portrait of Aleksandr Rumnev?), early 1920s, pencil, watercolor, and gouache on paper, State Central Theatrical Library. St. Petersburg.
  • View in gallery
    Léon Bakst: Judith Holding the Head of Holofernes, 1922, oil on canvas, Robert Tobin Collection, Marion Koogler McNay Art Museum, San Antonio.
  • View in gallery
    Sergei Sudeikin: Costume for Tamara Karsavina as Salomé in the premiere of La tragédie de Salomé at the Théâtre des Champs Elysées, Paris, 1913. Reproduced in Comoedia Illustré, Paris, 1913, No. 17, unpaginated.
  • View in gallery
    Emil Otto Hoppé, photographer: Tamara Karsavina as Salomé in Sergei Diaghilev’s production of La Tragédie de Salomé at the Théâtre des Champs Elysées, Paris, 1913. Photograph courtesy of Curatorial Assistance, Pasadena, California.
  • View in gallery
    Marianne Werefkin: Self-Portrait, 1910s, pencil on paper, Museo comunale d’arte moderna, Fondazione Marianne Werefkin: Call No.: Notebook f8, sheet 12-13, Museo Comunale d’Arte Moderna, Ascona.
  • View in gallery
    Marianne Werefkin: Portrait of Salomè, ca. 1930, oil and mixed tecnique on paper, Matasci Collection, Ternero.
  • View in gallery
    Alexandra Exter: Costume design for the Dance of the Seven Veils in Aleksandr Tairov’s production of Salomé, Chamber Theater, Moscow, 1917, silver, bronze, and gouache on cardboard, Bakhrushin State Theater Museum, Moscow.
  • View in gallery
    Petr Galadzhev: Stage design for the one-act ballet Salomé (music by Richard Strauss with designs by Nikolai Musatov and choreography by Kasian Goleizovsky), Moscow, 1922. Print impression for the journal Zrelishcha, Moscow, 1923.
  • View in gallery
    Oton Engels: Zinaida Tarkhovskaia Dancing “Salome” (music by Richard Strauss with choreography by Lev Lukin for the Moscow Free Ballet), 1923, pencil and Indian ink on paper. Collection of Irina Malakhova, Moscow.
  • View in gallery
    Photographer unknown: Zinaida Verbova dancing Salomé. Reproduced from in V. Parnac: Histoire de la danse (Paris: Editions Rieder, 1932), plate LVI.
  • View in gallery
    Photographer unknown: Zinaida Verbova dancing Salomé. Reproduced from Z. Punina and Yu. Kharlamova, eds.: Ritm i kultura tantsa (Leningrad: Akademiia, 1926), unpaginated.
  • View in gallery
    Aleksei Sidorov: Photograph of Nina Legat in a reconstruction of Egyptian dances in the Egyptian Rooms of the Museum of Fine Arts, Moscow (now the Pushkin Museum of Fine Arts), choreographed by Nikolai Leontiev, 1927.

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