Bronislava Nijinska and the Spirit of Modernism

in Experiment
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Abstract

No one should make judgments about ballets that no longer exist. Choreographer Bronislava Nijinska's surviving masterpieces offer sufficient proof of a a brilliant and varied imagination, inspired by her classical training; by the example of her brother, Vaslav Nijinsky; and by contemporary developments in the visual arts.

Bronislava Nijinska and the Spirit of Modernism

in Experiment

Sections

References

1)

André Levinson“Stravinsky and the Dance,” in André Levinson on Dance: Writings from Paris in the Twentiesed. Joan Acocella and Lynn Garafola (Hanover: Wesleyan University Press 1991) p. 41.

2)

Igor StravinskyChronicle of My Life (London: Victor Gollancz1936) pp. 174-175.

7)

KandinskyConcerning the Spiritual in Art p. 50.

8)

Ibid. p. 1.

9)

Kyril Fitzlyon“Translator’s Preface,” The Diary of Vaslav Nijinskyed. Joan Acocella (New York: Farrar Straus and Giroux 1999) p. xlviii-xlix.

10)

Kandinsky“On Stage Composition” p. 113.

12)

KandinskyConcerning the Spiritual in Art pp. 6-9.

13)

Nijinska“On Movement” p. 85.

14)

Kandinsky“On Stage Composition” p. 111.

15)

Nijinska“On Movement” p. 85.

16)

KandinskyConcerning the Spiritual in Art p. 24.

Figures

  • View in gallery
    Bronislava Nijinska (inscribed).
  • View in gallery
    Holy Etudes, 1925.
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    Oakland Ballet balletmaster Howard Sayette with Irina Nijinska, the choreographer’s daughter.
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    Irina Nijinska and Frank Ries, who together reconstructed Le Train Bleu for Oakland Ballet in 1989.
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    Joy Gim as The Spanish Dancer in Bronislava Nijinska’s Bolero, which Nina Youshkevitch staged for Oakland Ballet in 1995.
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    Bronislava Nijinska’s ballet Le Baiser de la Fée.
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    Costume design for Bronislava Nijinska’s ballet Mephisto Waltz by Vadim Meller, Kiev, 1919. Watercolor, gouache, pencil, and Indian ink on paper, Courtesy of Nina and Nikita D. Lobanov-Rostovsky.
  • View in gallery
    Bronislava Nijinska playing The Hostess in her own ballet Les Biches, 1924.
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    Bronislava Nijinska, 1937.
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    Nina Youshkevitch and Zbigniew Kilinski in the Polish Ballet production of Bronislava Nijinska’s Chopin Concerto, 1937-38.
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    Nina Youshkevitch and Igor Youskevitch in the Original Ballet Russe production of Bronislava Nijinska’s Les Cent Baisers, Australian Tour, 1936-37.
  • View in gallery
    Nina Youshkevitch in Bronislava Nijinska’s Chopin Concerto, Polish Ballet, 1937-38.
  • View in gallery
    Nina Youshkevitch as the Princess in Bronislava Nijinska’s Les Cent Baisers, Original Ballet Russe, Australian Tour, 1936-37.
  • View in gallery
    Choreographer Bronislava Nijinska’s Pictures at an Exhibition.
  • View in gallery
    Choreographer Bronislava Nijinska’s Pictures at an Exhibition.
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    Bronislava Nijinska’s Les Biches, Rome Opera Ballet, 2009.
  • View in gallery
    Bronislava Nijinska’s Les Biches, Rome Opera Ballet, 2009.
  • View in gallery
    Ida Rubinstein as The Dancer in Bronislava Nijinska’s Bolero, Paris Opera, 1928.

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