Sculpture at the “Last Futurist Exhibition of Paintings ‘0.10’ (Zero-Ten)”

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Abstract

This article explores the “Last Futurist Exhibition of Paintings ‘0.10’” (1915) as a key moment when Russian painters began to work seriously in three dimensions, exploring the nature of materials, questioning the relationship between art and reality, and ultimately laying the foundation for the subsequent emergence of the Constructivist movement. The exhibition revealed an important strand in Russian creative thinking and practice concerning sculpture and the nature of artistic materials.

Sculpture at the “Last Futurist Exhibition of Paintings ‘0.10’ (Zero-Ten)”

in Experiment

Sections

References

2)

Douglas“0-10 Exhibition” 34-40.

3)

Jean-Claude Marcadé“Bildskulpturen,” in Iwan Puni 1892-1956 (Berlin: Berlinische Galerie, Museum für Moderne Kunst, Photographie und Architektur, Martin Gropius Bau1993) 96.

5)

See John E. Bowlt“Exhibition of Painting,” in Die Kunstismen in Russland 1907-30/The Isms of Art in Russia 1907-30 (Cologne: Galerie Gmurzynska1977) 76.

6)

Ivan PuniSovremennaia zhivopis’ (Berlin: V. D. Frenkel-Verlag1923) 31.

10)

Anon“Tramvai V-pervaia vystavka,” Ogenok (Petrograd) 3 (March 1915) reproduced in Berninger and Cartier Pougny 40; French translation Berninger and Cartier Pougny 150.

20)

Norbert LyntonTatlin’s Tower: Monument to Revolution (New Haven and London: Yale Univ. Press2009) 51.

21)

A. Rostislavov“O vystvke futuristov,” Rech’ (Petrograd) January 1916; reproduced in Berninger and Cartier Pougny 62; French translation in Berninger and Cartier Pougny 159-160.

22)

Douglas“0-10 Exhibition” 37. Douglas makes a distinction between Malevich’s and Tatlin’s concept of space: Tatlin reached for the sky and Malevich for the cosmos.

23)

Margit RowellThe Planar Dimension: Europe 1912-1932 (New York: Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum1979) 22.

25)

V. MarkovPrintsipy tvorchestva v plasticheskikh iskusstvakh. Faktura (St Petersburg: Izd. Soiuz Molodezhi1914) 56.

26)

John MilnerVladimir Tatlin and the Russian Avant-Garde (New Haven and London: Yale Univ. Press1983) 112.

28)

Mikhail Matiushin“O knige Metzanzhe-Gleza ‘Du Cubisme’,” Soiuz molodezhi (St. Petersburg) 3 (March 1913) 25-34; English translation Matyushin “Of the Book by Gleizes and Metzinger Du Cubisme” in Linda Dalrymple Henderson The Fourth Dimension and Non-Euclidean Geometry in Modern Art (Princeton: Princeton Univ. Press 1983) 368-75.

31)

Berninger and CartierPougny195.

38)

M. Matiushin“K vystavke poslednykh futuristov,” Ocharovannyi strannik (Petrograd) 10 (1916) 16-18; reprinted in Malevich o sebe. Sovremenniki o Maleviche. Pis’ma. Dokumenty. Kritika ed. I. A. Vakar and T. N. Mikhienko vol. 2 (Moscow: RA 1994) 124.

39)

Strigalev“An Excursion Around the 0.10 Exhibition” 92.

40)

Anon“Po vystavkam. U futuristov,” Petrogradskie vedomosti (Petrograd) 22 December 1915; reproduced in Berninger and Cartier Pougny 57; French translation Berninger and Cartier Pougny 156. Strigalev suggests that the reviewer has mistaken the title and author (Strigalev “An Excursion Around the 0.10 Exhibition” 86).

41)

Berninger and CartierPougny58-9.

47)

A. Rostislavov“Pevatel’nitsa novatorov. (Po povodu lektsii),” Rech’ (Petrograd) 15 January 1916; reproduced in Berninger and Cartier Pougny 77; French translation Berninger and Cartier Pougny 165.

53)

Sarab’ianovIvan Puni72.

54)

Jean-Claude Marcadé“Puni und die Sankt Petersburger Avantgarde,” in Iwan Puni 1892-195618.

59

) PuniRelief1915. Oil on canvas collage pieces of wood 63 x 81 cm. Musée National d’Art Moderne Paris; reproduced in Berninger and Cartier Pougny 183 No. 37.

62)

Ivan PuniSovremennaia zhivopis’ (Berlin: L. D. Frenkel-Verlag1923) 29.

64)

Strigalev“An Excursion Around the 0.10 Exhibition”72.

65)

KliunMoi put’ v iskusstve84.

66)

See HendersonThe Fourth Dimension and Non-Euclidean Geometry in Modern Art274-94.

68)

Anon“0,10 (Futuristicheskaia vystavka),” Golos Rossii (21 January 1916); reproduced in Berninger and Cartier Pougny 75; French translation Berninger and Cartier Pougny 164.

70)

Anon“0,10 (Futuristicheskaia vystavka),” Golos Rossii (Petrograd) 21 January 1916; reproduced in Berninger and Cartier Pougny 75; French translation Berninger and Cartier Pougny 164.

72)

Strigalev“An Excursion Around the 0.10 Exhibition” 95.

73)

Reproduced in Christina LodderRussian Constructivism (New Haven and London: Yale Univ. Press1983) 20 1. 18.

74)

See KliunMoi put’ v iskusstve294 104.

77)

See Anon“0.10—Posledniaia vystavka futuristov v Petrograde,” Ogonek (Petrograd) 1 (3 January 1916); reproduced in Berninger and Cartier Pougny 65; and Ol’ga Rozanova. “Lefanta chiol . . .” (Moscow: RA 2002) 314.

81)

Charlotte Douglas“The Art of Pure Design: The Move to Abstraction in Russian and English Art and Textiles: A Meditation,” in Russian Art and The West: A Century of Dialogue in Painting Architecture and the Decorative Artsed. Rosalind P. Blakesley and Susan E. Reid (DeKalb, Ill.: Northern Illinois Univ. Press2007) 99-101. Quotation in Douglas “The Art of Pure Design” 100.

84)

Strigalev“An Excursion Around the 0.10 Exhibition” 90.

89)

DabrowskiLiubov Popova12-13.

Figures

  • View in gallery
    “Tramvai V—Pervaia vystavka” [Streetcar V—The First Exhibition], Ogonek (Petrograd), 3 (March 1915) showing 1. Ivan Kliun’s Rapidly Passing Landscape (Dear One); 2. Kazimir Malevich’s Englishman in Moscow; 3. Kseniia Boguslavskaia’s Toilette; and 4. Ivan Puni’s Card Players.
  • View in gallery
    “‘0,10’—Posledniaia vystavka futuristov v Petrograde” [‘0.10’—The Last Futurist Exhibition in Petrograd], Ogonek (Petrograd), 12 (December 1915) showing 1. Ivan Kliun’s Cubist at her Toilette; 2 & 3, Olga Rozanova’s The Cyclist and The Automobile; and 4 & 5, Ivan Puni’s Hairdresser and Washing Windows.
  • View in gallery
    Vladimir Tatlin. Corner Counter-relief, 1915. Lost, presumed destroyed.
  • View in gallery
    Vladimir Tatlin. Corner Counter Relief, 1915, reconstructed by the artist, 1925. Blackened iron sheet, copper, wood, rope, reinforcing elements, 71 × 118 cm. State Russian Museum, St. Petersburg.
  • View in gallery
    Ivan Puni. Suprematist Sculpture, 1915. Wood, iron sheet, cardboard, papiers collés and gouache, 10 × 35 × 2.8 cm. Private collection.
  • View in gallery
    Ivan Kliun. Cubist at Her Toilette, 1915. Lost, presumed destroyed.
  • View in gallery
    Olga Rozanova. Preliminary sketch for The Automobile, 1915. Pencil on paper, 13.5 × 10.1 cm. Courtesy of State Museum of Contemporary Art-Costakis Collection, Thessaloniki.
  • View in gallery
    Olga Rozanova. Preliminary sketch for The Automobile (verso of figure 58), 1915. Pencil on paper, 13.5 × 10.1 cm. Courtesy of State Museum of Contemporary Art-Costakis Collection, Thessaloniki.
  • View in gallery
    Liubov Popova. Jug on a Table (Plastic Painting), 1915. Oil on cardboard, mounted on wood, 58.5 × 45.5 cm. State Tretiakov Gallery, Moscow.

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