Medical Services and ʿAbbasid Ladies

in Hawwa
Restricted Access
Get Access to Full Text
Rent on DeepDyve

Have an Access Token?



Enter your access token to activate and access content online.

Please login and go to your personal user account to enter your access token.



Help

Have Institutional Access?



Access content through your institution. Any other coaching guidance?



Connect

The ʿAbbasid harem was at the center of several important studies, particular attention was given to the political activity and networking of notable women, mothers, sisters and wives of caliphs. Similarly, the charity activity and endowments of different ʿAbbasid ladies was studied and compared to male charity activity. Nonetheless, these activities (political networking and endowments) had implications hitherto not addressed; medical services are a case in point. This paper examines several medical choices and medical endowment made by ʿAbbasid ladies between the 8th–10th centuries. The paper will explore the implications these activities had for the transmission and appropriation of Galenic medicine in the early Abbasid period. In particular the paper will discuss the dedication of a medical book to Shujaʿ, the mother of Mutawwakil.

Medical Services and ʿAbbasid Ladies

in Hawwa

Sections

References

AbbottNabia Two queens of Baghdad: Mother and Wife of Hārūn al-Rashīd 1946 London Al Saqi

Abī al-Faraj ʿAbd al-Raḥmān ibn ʿAlī ibn Muḥammad ibn al-Jawzī Al-Muntaẓam fī tārīkh al-mulūk wa-al-umam 1992 Bayrūt Dār al-Kutub al-ʿIlmīyah (taḥqīq Muhammad ʿAbd al-Qādir ʿAṭā Muṣṭafá ʿAbd al-Qādir ʿAṭā rājaʿahu wa-ṣaḥḥaḥahu Naʿīm Zarzūr)

al-RāzīAbū Bakr Muḥammad b. Zakariyya Kitab al-Hawi fī al-Tibb 1965 Hyderabad Osmania Oriental Publications Bureau, Osmania University (name of editor not mentioned)

AnkawiAbdullah “The Pilgrimage to Mecca in Mamluk Times” Arabian Studies 1974 1 146 170

BaskinJudith R. “Some parallels in the education of medieval Jewish and Christian women” Hîstôrya yêhûdît Jewish history 1991 5 1 41 51

BaskinJudith R. “The Education of Jewish Girls in the Middle Ages in Muslim and Christian Countries” Peamim 1999 82 2 31 49 [heb]

BerkeyJonathan P. KeddieNikki R.BaronBeth “Women and Islamic Education in the Mamluk Period” Women in Middle Eastern history: Shifting Boundaries in Sex and Gender 1991 New haven and London Yale University Press 143 160

DolsMichael W. “The origins of the Islamic hospital: myth and reality” Bulletin of the History of Medicine 1987 61 3 367 390

DunlopD.M. BearmanP.BianquisTh.BosworthC.E.van DonzelE.HeinrichsW.P. “Bīmāristān” Encyclopaedia of Islam Second Edition Brill Online 2013. Reference. Ben-Gurion University of Negev. 27 August 2013 http://referenceworks.brillonline.com/entries/encyclopaedia-of-islam-2/bimaristan-com_0123

Ed. “al-Khayzurān bint ʿAṭāʾ al-Djurashiyya” BearmanP.BianquisTh.BosworthC.E.van DonzelE.HeinrichsW.P. Encyclopaedia of Islam Second Edition Brill Online 2013. Reference. Ben-Gurion University of Negev. 07 September 2013 http://referenceworks.brillonline.com/entries/encyclopaedia-of-islam-2/al-khayzuran-bint-ata-al-djurashiyya-sim_4265

El CheikhNadia Maria “Revisiting the Abbasid Harems” Journal of Middle East Women’s Studies 2005 1 3 1 19

El Cheikh BrubakerLeslieSmithJulia M.H. “Gender and Politics in the Harem of al-Muqtadir” Gender in the Early Medieval World East and West 300–900 2004 Cambridge Cambridge University Press 144 155

FaroqhiSuraiya Pilgrims and Sultans: the Hajj under the Ottomans 1517–1683 1996 London, New York Tauris

FieJean Maurice Chrétien Syriaque sous les Abbassides surtout á Bagdad (749–1258) 1980 Louvain Secrétariat du CorpusSCO

FrançoiseMicheau JacquartDanielle “Mécènes et médecins à Bagdad au iiie/ixe siècle les commanditaires des traductions Galien par Ḥunayn ibn Isḥāq” Les voies de la science grecque étude sur la transmission des textes de l’Antiquité au dix-neuvièm siècle 1997 Genève Librairie DORZE S.A. 176 179

GigandetSuzanne “Al-Rīsāla al-Hārūniyya de Masīẖ b. al-H̱akam al-Dīmašqī. Un traité médical composé au iiie/ixe siècle” Studia Islamica 1995 82 137 144

GiladiAvner “Liminal Craft, Exceptional Law: Preliminary Notes on Midwives in Medieval Islamic Writings” International Journal of Middle East Studies 2010 42 2 185 202

GiladiAvner IlanNahem “The Individual in Education System, In Early Islam” Islam and Intertwined Worlds 2002 Jerusalem Yad Ben Zvi 171 190 [heb]

GreenMonica H. Making Women’s Medicine Masculine: The Rise of Male Authority in Pre-Modern Gynaecology 2008 Oxford, New York Oxford University Press

GreenMonica H. “The Possibilities of Literacy and the Limits of Reading: Women and the Gendering of Medical Literacy” Women’s Health Care in the Medieval West texts and contexts 2000 ed. Aldershot Ashgate 1 76

HansonAnn Ellis “The Eight Months’ Child and the Etiquette of Birth: Obsit Omen” Bulletin of the History of Medicine 1987 61 4 589 602

HartmannAngelika BearmanP.BianquisTh.BosworthC.E.van DonzelE.HeinrichsW.P. “al-Nāṣir Li-Dīn Allāh” Encyclopaedia of Islam Second Edition Brill Online 2013. Reference. Ben-Gurion University of Negev. 27 August 2013 http://referenceworks.brillonline.com/entries/encyclopaedia-of-islam-2/al-nasir-li-din-allah-com_0854

IbnAbī UṣaybiʿaMuwaffaq al-Dīn Abu ’l-ʿAbbās Aḥmād b. al-Qāsim b. Khalīfa b. Yūnus al-Khazrajī MullerA. ʿUyūn al-Anbāʾ fī Ṭabaqāt al-Aṭibbāʾ 1884 Cairo al-matbaʿa al-wahabyya

Ibnal-QifṭīJamāl al-Dīn Abu ’l-Ḥasan ʿAlī b. Yūsuf b. Ibrāhīm b. ʿAbd al-Wāḥid al-Shaybānī LippertJ. Ikhbār al-ʿUlamāʾ bi-Akhbār al-Ḥukamāʾ 1903 Leipzig Dieterich’sche Verlagsbuchhandlung

LevYaacov Charity Endowments and Charitable Institutions in Medieval Islam 2005 University Press of Florida

PellatCharles “Badr al-Muʿtaḍidī” Encyclopaedia of Islam Second Edition Brill Online 2013. Reference. Ben-Gurion University of Negev. 27 May 2013 http://referenceworks.brillonline.com/entries/encyclopaedia-of-islam-2/badr-al-mutadidi-sim_839

PormannPeterSavage-SmithEmilie Medieval Islamic Medicine 2007 Washington Georgetown University Press

PormannPeter NawasJ. “Islamic Hospitals in the Time of al-Muqtadir” Abbasid Studies II: Occasional Papers of the School of ʿAbbasid Studies Leuven 28 June–1 July 2004 2010 Leuven Dudley 337 382 Mass: Peeters

ShalabīAḥmad History of Muslim Education 1954 Dar Al-Kashshaf

Shefer-MosensohnMiri KalimIbrahim “Hospitals and Medical Institutions” Oxford Encyclopedia of Philosophy Science and Technology in Islam 2014 1 Oxford Oxford University Press 290 297

Shefer-MosensohnMiri “A Sick Sultana in the Ottoman Imperial Palace: Male Doctors, Female Healers and Female Patients in the Early Modern Period” Hawwa 2011 9 3 281 312

Shefer-MosensohnMiri Ottoman Medicine 2009 New York SUNY Press

TabbaaYasser RugglesFairchild D. “Dayfa Khatun: Regent Queen and Architectural Patron” Women Patronage and Self-Representation 2000 New York SUNY Press 17 34

UllmannManfred Die Medizin im Islam 1970 Leiden Brill

17

Yaacov LevCharity Endowments and Charitable Institutions in Medieval Islam (Gainesville: University Press of Florida2005) pp. 120–126. In the Ottoman Empire the foundation of hospitals was a charity performed exclusively by the royal family—including mothers wives and sisters of the Sultan—up to the 19th century. Miri Shefer-Mosensohn “Hospitals and Medical Institutions” Oxford Encyclopedia of Philosophy Science and Technology in Islam ed. Ibrahim Kalim (Oxford: Oxford University Press 2014) 1: 290–297.

18

Suraiya FaroqhiPilgrims and Sultans: the Hajj under the Ottomans 1517–1683 (London, New York: Tauris1996) pp. 110–111. According to a rescript from 1556 an unidentified female lady made specific arrangements for sick pilgrims. She bought a building to house them and built a bath. The income from the bath was dedicated to sponsoring the needs of the sick and shrouds for the dead. According to Faroqhi this action was not only intended for the wellbeing of the ill but for pilgrims in general as the ill and weak stayed in various places such as streets and mosques thus preventing the actual activity the mosque was intended for.

20

D.M. Dunlop“Bīmāristān,” Encyclopaedia of IslamSecond Edition. Edited by: P. Bearman Th. Bianquis C.E. Bosworth E. van Donzel W.P. Heinrichs. Brill Online 2013. Reference. Ben-Gurion University of Negev. 27 August 2013 http://referenceworks.brillonline.com/entries/encyclopaedia-of-islam-2/bimaristan-com_0123.

22

Angelika Hartmann“al-Nāṣir Li-Dīn Allāh.” Encyclopaedia of IslamSecond Edition. Edited by: P. Bearman Th. Bianquis C.E. Bosworth E. van Donzel W.P. Heinrichs. Brill Online 2013. Reference. Ben-Gurion University of Negev. 27 August 2013 http://referenceworks.brillonline.com/entries/encyclopaedia-of-islam-2/al-nasir-li-din-allah-com_0854; Lev p. 27.

24

Pormann and Savage-SmithMedieval Islamic Medicine p. 105.

30

Green“The Possibilities of Literacy”1–76.

33

See Giladi“The Individual in the Early Islamic Education System” pp. 171–90. For Jewish girls and the debate regarding whether or not they should be educated see Judith R. Baskin “The Education of Jewish Girls in the Middle Ages in Muslim and Christian Countries” Peamim 82.2 (1999): 31–49 [heb].

34

See Berkey“Women and Islamic Education” p. 150; Shalabī History of Muslim p. 191.

35

Shalabī p. 201. See for instance education provided by Zubaydah to her pages and slave girls: Abbot Two Queens p. 160.

36

Avner Giladi“Liminal Craft, Exceptional Law: Preliminary Notes on Midwives in Medieval Islamic Writings,” International Journal of Middle East Studies42.02 (2010): 185–202.

37

Al-MasūʿdīMuruj al-Dhahab8: 295–296.

Index Card

Content Metrics

Content Metrics

All Time Past Year Past 30 Days
Abstract Views 12 12 8
Full Text Views 12 12 12
PDF Downloads 2 2 2
EPUB Downloads 0 0 0