The White Lady Travels: Narrating Fez and Spacing Colonial Authority in Edith Wharton's In Morocco

in Hawwa
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Abstract

Foregrounding Orientalism as a system of thought that has produced constructed images and disfigured discourses about Europe's Other, this paper is primarily concerned with the practice of delineating landscape and manipulating the space of Fez in Edith Wharton's In Morocco. It starts with a rereading of Edward Said's model of analysis and then moves to an investigation into how this travel narrative displays, vulgarizes, and reproduces one of the strategies characteristic of colonial discourse: the mapping of the colonial space, specifically through the inscription of self and Other power relations, fueled up by a will to knowledge and control over new territories. It also attempts to read Wharton's narrative against Sara Mills' argument, which claims that it is gender rather than genre that is at the genesis of colonial heterogeneity.

The White Lady Travels: Narrating Fez and Spacing Colonial Authority in Edith Wharton's In Morocco

in Hawwa

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