Sowing the Seeds of Diplomacy on Hard American Ground

in The Hague Journal of Diplomacy
Restricted Access
Get Access to Full Text
Rent on DeepDyve

Have an Access Token?



Enter your access token to activate and access content online.

Please login and go to your personal user account to enter your access token.



Help

Have Institutional Access?



Access content through your institution. Any other coaching guidance?



Connect

Diplomacy is a neglected field in American higher education. Both practitioners and academics have repeatedly cast the seeds to grow the discipline in the United States, but with limited germination. Although diplomacy curricula are rare, courses do exist. Following a review of 75 syllabuses and lengthy interviews with many of their authors, this article’s author finds that academics and practitioners teaching the limited number of diplomacy courses make very different choices in content and pedagogy. Drawing on over 25 years of diplomatic practice followed by twenty years teaching at the college level, she evaluates why the main institutions of American society do not support diplomacy as either a profession or a field of study. The article argues that the few ‘resident gardeners’ rarely stray from their own plots to ‘fieldscape’ together in hard American ground.

Sowing the Seeds of Diplomacy on Hard American Ground

in The Hague Journal of Diplomacy

Sections

References

4

James Piereson and Naomi Schaefer Riley‘The Problem with Public Policy Schools’Washington Post (6 December 2013) available online at https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/the-problem-with-public-policy-schools/2013/12/06/40d13c10-57ba-11e3-835d-e7173847c7cc_story.html (accessed 20 November 2015).

7

HarrisonGardens p. 26.

9

Emanuel Adler and Vincent Pouliot‘International Practices’International Theoryvol. 3 no. 1 (2011) pp. 1-36.

16

Iver B. Neumann‘A Speech that the Entire Ministry May Stand for, or: Why Diplomats Never Produce Anything New’International Political Sociology vol. 1 issue 2 (2007) pp. 183-200 doi: 10.1111/j.1749-5687.2007.00012.

25

Michael Desch‘Technique Trumps Relevance: The Professionalization of Political Science and the Marginalization of Security Studies’American Political Science Associationvol. 13 no. 2 (June 2015) pp. 377-407.

28

Paul Sharp‘Practitioners and Scholars of the Study of Diplomacy’Foreign Service Journal (January-February 2015) pp. 39-41.

35

Geoffrey Wiseman‘Pax Americana: Bumping into Diplomatic Culture’International Studies Perspectivesvol. 6 issue 4 (2005) p. 410.

36

Laurence PopeThe Demilitarization of American Diplomacy: Two Cheers for Stripped Pants (New York: Palgrave Macmillan2014) p. 49.

39

David H. Petraeus‘Holbrooke: My Diplomatic Wingman’The Washington Post (17 December 2010) available online at http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2010/12/14/AR2010121403026.html (accessed 17 December 2013).

41

Chester A. Crocker‘The Art of Peace: Bringing Diplomacy Back to Washington’Foreign Affairs (July/August 2007) p. 163.

45

Barbara K. Bodine‘Teaching Diplomacy as Process (Not Event): A Practitioner’s Song’Foreign Service Journal (January-February 2015) p. 25.

46

Andrew Bennett and Jeffery T. CheckelProcess Tracing: From Metaphor to Analytic Tool (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press2014) Kindle Edition loc. 217-218.

47

Michael Desch‘Technique Trumps Relevance: The Professionalization of Political Science and the Marginalization of Security Studies’American Political Science Associationvol. 13 no. 2 (June 2015) pp. 377-407.

53

Wiseman‘Pax Americana’ pp. 409-410.

54

Iver B. Neumann‘The English School on Diplomacy’Discussion Papers in Diplomacy (The Hague: Netherlands Institute of International Relations ‘Clingendael’ 2002) available online at http://clingendael.info/publications/2002/20020300_cli_paper_dip_issue79.pdf (last accessed 8 March 2014).

64

Pauline Kerr and Geoffrey Wiseman (eds.)Diplomacy in a Globalizing World (Oxford: Oxford University Press2013) p. 342.

69

Parker J. Palmer‘A New Professional: The Aims of Education Revisited’Change: The Magazine of Higher Learning (November-December 2007) available online at http://www.changemag.org/Archives/Back%20Issues/November-December%202007/full-new-professional.html (accessed 18 August 2013).

Information

Content Metrics

Content Metrics

All Time Past Year Past 30 Days
Abstract Views 53 53 23
Full Text Views 69 69 56
PDF Downloads 4 4 1
EPUB Downloads 0 0 0