Domestic Constraints on the Rise of Chinese Public Diplomacy

In: The Hague Journal of Diplomacy
Author: Yiwei Wang 1
View More View Less
  • 1 Institute of International and Public Affairs, Tongji University, Shanghai, 200092, People’s Republic of China

Purchase instant access (PDF download and unlimited online access):

€29.95$34.95

Summary

Chinese public diplomacy — considered to be the continuation of its internal affairs — is booming unlike anywhere else in the world. Yet its rise is being hampered by several domestic constraints that are identity-related, institutional, societal and cultural in nature. This contribution aims to shed light on the domestic dilemmas that could hamper the rise of Chinese public diplomacy. It first explains what Chinese public diplomacy entails and the initiatives that have been undertaken by the Chinese government in this field. It then focuses on the different kinds of domestic pressures that are challenging the rise of Chinese public diplomacy, and briefly touches upon the case study of Chinese public diplomacy towards Europe, while suggesting paths to overcome these challenges. The author suggests that in order for Chinese public diplomacy to reach its full potential, China needs to overcome its domestic constraints, and to this end, the Chinese government needs to stimulate the collaboration of Chinese domestic non-state actors with international civil society around shared values.

  • 2)

    David Pilling, ‘Why China’s Charm Offensive is Doomed to Failure’, Financial Times, 23 February 2011, available online at http://www.ftchinese.com/story/001041765/en.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 6)

    J. Nye, Soft Power: The Means to Success in World Politics (New York: PublicAffairs, 2004).

  • 11)

    Cai Wu, ‘Brilliant Achievement, Valuable Experience’, People’s Daily, 4 November 2011, p. 5, available online at http://cpc.people.com.cn/GB/64093/64102/16130220.html.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 12)

    Joseph S. Nye Jr, ‘Why China Is Weak on Soft Power’, International Herald Tribune, 17 January 2012; and Li Baojie, Cheng Yifeng and Wang Mian, ‘Soft Power a New Focus at China’s Two Sessions’, Xinhua, 14 March 2007.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 15)

    Yang Jiechi, ‘China’s Public Diplomacy’, Qiushi Journal, vol. 3, no. 3, 1 July 2011, available online at http://english.qstheory.cn/international/201109/t20110924_112601.htm.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 16)

    Henry Kissinger, On China (New York: Penguin, 2011), chapter 5.

  • 17)

    See, for example, Khalid R. Al-Rodham, ‘A Critique of the China Threat Theory’, Asian Perspective, vol. 3, no. 3, 2007, pp. 41-66.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 22)

    Joseph S. Nye Jr, ‘Why China Is Weak on Soft Power’, International Herald Tribune, 17 January 2012.

  • 23)

    Liang Qichao, ‘Introduction to Chinese History’, in Yinbinshi Heji [Complete Works of Liang Qichao] (Beijing: Beijing Press, 1901), 1 (6), pp. 11-12.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 28)

    Song Lilei and Wang Yiwei, ‘Chinese Public Diplomacy toward Europe: Goals, Progress and Challenges’, Contemporary International Relations, 2011, issue 5, pp. 8-24.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 29)

    Yiwei Wang, ‘Public Diplomacy and the Rise of Chinese Soft Power’, The Annals of American Academy of Political and Social Science, no. 616, March 2008, p. 272.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation

Content Metrics

All Time Past Year Past 30 Days
Abstract Views 288 119 6
Full Text Views 146 13 3
PDF Views & Downloads 47 15 5