Save

Deterioration of the cell wall in waterlogged wooden archeological artifacts, 2400 years old

In: IAWA Journal
Authors:
Juan Guo Department of Wood Anatomy and Utilization, Research Institute of Wood Industry, Chinese Academy of Forestry, Beijing 100091, China.
Wood Collections (WOODPEDIA), Chinese Academy of Forestry, Beijing 100091, China.

Search for other papers by Juan Guo in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
,
Lin Xiao Chengdu Institute of Cultural Relics and Archaeology, Chengdu 610072, Sichuan Province, China.
Key Scientific Research Base of Excavated Wood and Lacquer ware Conservation, State Administration of Cultural Heritage (Chengdu Workstation), Chengdu 610072, Sichuan Province, China.

Search for other papers by Lin Xiao in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
,
Liuyang Han Department of Wood Anatomy and Utilization, Research Institute of Wood Industry, Chinese Academy of Forestry, Beijing 100091, China.
Wood Collections (WOODPEDIA), Chinese Academy of Forestry, Beijing 100091, China.

Search for other papers by Liuyang Han in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
,
Hao Wu Key Scientific Research Base of Excavated Wood and Lacquer ware Conservation, State Administration of Cultural Heritage (Chengdu Workstation), Chengdu 610072, Sichuan Province, China.
Jingzhou Conservation Center, Jingzhou 434020, Hubei Province, China.

Search for other papers by Hao Wu in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
,
Tao Yang Chengdu Institute of Cultural Relics and Archaeology, Chengdu 610072, Sichuan Province, China.
Key Scientific Research Base of Excavated Wood and Lacquer ware Conservation, State Administration of Cultural Heritage (Chengdu Workstation), Chengdu 610072, Sichuan Province, China.

Search for other papers by Tao Yang in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
,
Shunqing Wu Key Scientific Research Base of Excavated Wood and Lacquer ware Conservation, State Administration of Cultural Heritage (Chengdu Workstation), Chengdu 610072, Sichuan Province, China.
Jingzhou Conservation Center, Jingzhou 434020, Hubei Province, China.

Search for other papers by Shunqing Wu in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
, and
Yafang Yin Department of Wood Anatomy and Utilization, Research Institute of Wood Industry, Chinese Academy of Forestry, Beijing 100091, China.
Wood Collections (WOODPEDIA), Chinese Academy of Forestry, Beijing 100091, China.

Search for other papers by Yafang Yin in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
Download Citation Get Permissions

Access options

Get access to the full article by using one of the access options below.

Institutional Login

Log in with Open Athens, Shibboleth, or your institutional credentials

Login via Institution

Purchase

Buy instant access (PDF download and unlimited online access):

$34.95

ABSTRACT

The relationship between the cell wall ultrastructure of waterlogged wooden archeological artifacts and the state of water bound to cell walls and free in voids is fundamental to develop consolidating and drying technologies. Herein, a lacquer-wooden ware and a boat-coffin dating 4th century BC were selected as representative artifacts to study. Wood anatomy results indicated that they belonged to Idesia sp. and Machilus sp., respectively. They exhibited a typical spongy texture, as revealed by SEM observations, and their water contents had increased significantly. Solid state NMR, Py-GC/MS, imaging FTIR microscopy and 2D-XRD results demonstrated that the deterioration resulted from the partial cleavages of both polysaccharide backbones and cellulose hydrogen-bonding networks, almost complete elimination of acetyl side chains of hemicellulose, the partial depletion of β-O-4 interlinks, as well as oxidation and demethylation/demethoxylation of lignin. These further caused the disoriented arrangement of crystalline cellulose, and the decrease in cellulose crystallite dimensions and crystallinity. In consequence, mesopores and macropores formed, and the number of moisture-adsorbed sites and their accessibility increased. Moreover, results on free water deduced by the changes of pore structure and the maximum monolayer water capacity achieved by the GAB model indicated that water in waterlogged archeological wooden artifacts was mainly free water in mesopores.

Content Metrics

All Time Past Year Past 30 Days
Abstract Views 656 103 18
Full Text Views 47 14 0
PDF Views & Downloads 52 23 0