Trends in the Western Historiography of the United States’ Occupation of Germany

in International Bibliography of Military History
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This article examines the historiography of the U.S. Army’s occupation of Germany after World War II and how historians have portrayed the event in North-American literature. It argues that the central question dividing American historians is whether the U.S. occupation was too lenient or too harsh. This split began at the end of the war with Allied leaders divided between a harsh occupation of the Reich and containing the Soviets. This historiographical essay traces this, and other trends, in how historians have viewed the occupation.

Trends in the Western Historiography of the United States’ Occupation of Germany

in International Bibliography of Military History

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References

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GimbelA German Community under American Occupation Marburg 1945-529.

13

Irving Spiegel“Jewish Unit Sees Nazi Resurgence: American Committee, in Talk with Bonn’s Envoy, Says Bias Perils Freedom,” New York TimesJanuary 6 1960.

25

 See Richard L. Merritt“American Influences in the Occupation of Germany,” Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science 428 (Nov. 1976): 91-103 http://www.jstor.org/stable/1041876. (accessed December 9 2011) Constantine FitzGibbon Denazification (London 1969) Franklin M. Davis Come as a Conqueror: The United States Army’s Occupation of Germany 1945-1949 (New York 1967) xvi.

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Simon P. Mackenzie“Essay and Reflection: On the ‘Other Losses’ Debate,” The International Historical Review 14 no 4 (1992): 719 and 721 http://www.jstor.org/stable/40107116 (accessed Nov. 22 2011).

30

Richard H. Kohn“The Scholarship on World War II: Its Present Condition and Future Possibilities,” The Journal of Military History 55 no 3 (1991): 368 http://www.jstor.org/stable/1985685 (accessed Nov. 22 2011).

61

Sadao Asada“The Shock of the Atomic Bomb and Japan’s Decision to Surrender: A Reconsideration,” Pacific Historical Review 67 no. 4 (Nov. 1998): 478.

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