Implementers or Governors?

The Expanding Role for Private Military and Security Companies within the Peace Operations Network

in International Community Law Review
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This article explores the role of private security and military companies within the wider confinements of peace operations governance. To do so, the paper looks at the roles that pmscs play within two different us peace support initiatives as well as within un peace operations. Using theory lenses derived from the governance literature, the article finds that private military and security companies are already established actors within what it calls ‘the peace operations network’. By training forces, by building or reforming institutions, by supplying security and advisory services, or by being technological experts, private providers of military and security services carry out key tasks in the planning and implementation of peace operations. In the process, the paper argues, they ultimately exercise authority, make decisions and establish practices that often lay the foundations for the future management of security of local populations.

Implementers or Governors?

The Expanding Role for Private Military and Security Companies within the Peace Operations Network

in International Community Law Review

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References

6

Ibid.90.

17

By 2009un missions with gpoi-trained personnel included minurso in Western Sahara minustah in Haiti monuc in the Democratic Republic of Congo onub in Burundi unfil in Lebanon unmee in Ethiopia and Eritrea unmil in Liberia unmis in Sudan unoci in the Ivory Coast and unosil in Sierra Leone. gpoi-trained troops also contributed to unamid the joint auun operation in Darfur. See Serafino 2009 note 11 above.

22

In 2009the four companies under africap received a base one-year contract with four one-year extension options (DoS 2013) in most cases effectively a five-year long contract.

30

The project ended in 2009. See unops ‘What We Do’ Project id 00071858 available at www.unops.org/english/whatwedo/Pages/ProjectSummary.aspx?ProjectId=00071858 (accessed March 2011).

32

Ibid.38.

36

Ronco is owned by G4S Østensen 201342. See note 1 above. See also http://www.g4sgs.com/mine_clearance.html.

37

Ibid.42.

38

Østensen 201339. See note 1 above.

40

Serafino 200917. See note 11 above.

42

McFate 2008652. See note 26 above.

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