Mexico’s Drug War, International Jurisprudence, and the Role of Non-International Armed Conflict Status

in Journal of International Humanitarian Legal Studies
Restricted Access
Get Access to Full Text
Rent on DeepDyve

Have an Access Token?



Enter your access token to activate and access content online.

Please login and go to your personal user account to enter your access token.



Help

Have Institutional Access?



Access content through your institution. Any other coaching guidance?



Connect

When the Calderon Administration escalated anti-drug efforts in 2006, drug-related violence in Mexico reached unprecedented levels. The growing intensity of drug-related violence has led to uncertainty over how to classify the violence spreading across Mexico. Much of the public rhetoric argues that Mexico’s drug-related violence has surpassed that which typically characterizes the drug trade and is instead more similar to armed conflict. Due to the changing landscape of Mexican drug violence, an assessment of whether or not the conflict meets the requisite conditions for a non-international armed conflict (NIAC) is needed to determine if the application of international humanitarian law is appropriate. This paper argues that Mexico’s Drug War meets the conditions for NIAC status and application of IHL is appropriate. The question of how to respond to drug-related violence is becoming increasingly relevant as the effects of such violence extends to a more diverse geographic area within Mexico. NIAC status plays a central role in the future of anti-drug policy and has the potential to prompt significant changes in the handling of drug-related violence in Mexico. This paper attempts to provide a comprehensive answer to this question and identify the potential implications that recognition as a NIAC will have on Mexican anti-drug policy.

Mexico’s Drug War, International Jurisprudence, and the Role of Non-International Armed Conflict Status

in Journal of International Humanitarian Legal Studies

Sections

References

  • 8

    W. Booth‘Mexico’s War Compared to Insurgency’The Washington Post9 September 2010 http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2010/09/08/AR2010090807134.html (last accessed 25 May 2013).

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 19

    San Antonio Timessupra note 11.

  • 22

    Beittelsupra note 2 11.

  • 25

    Beittelsupra note 4 at 18.

  • 26

    Judahsupra note 20 at 72.

  • 30

    Beittelsupra note 4 at 13.

  • 31

    San Antonio Timessupra note 11.

  • 33

    Beittelsupra note 4 at 10.

  • 34

    Chu and Krousesupra note 21 at 1.

  • 35

    Beittelsupra note 2.

  • 37

    San Antonio Timessupra note 11.

  • 38

    S. Miller Llana‘Mexico Drug Traffickers’ Latest Weapon: ‘Monster’ Narco-Tanks’The Christian Science Monitor7 June 2011 http://www.csmonitor.com/World/Americas/Latin-America-Monitor/2011/0607/Mexican-drug-traffickers-latest-weapon-monster-narco-tanks.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 41

    Kansupra note 6 at 26-27.

  • 42

    Beittelsupra note 2 at 11.

  • 43

    Beittelsupra note 4 at 10.

  • 44

    Molzahn et alsupra note 36 at 1.

  • 45

    Beittelsupra note 4 at 14.

  • 50

    Beittelsupra note 4 at 10.

  • 54

    Kansupra note 6.

  • 55

    Molzahn et al.supra note 36.

  • 57

    Kansupra note 6.

  • 59

    Beittelsupra note 4 at 3.

  • 60

     See Molzahn et al.supra note 36 at 23-24.

  • 61

     See Beittelsupra note 4 at 18.

  • 66

    Chu and Krousesupra note 21 at 2.

  • 68

    Beittelsupra note 2.

  • 69

    N. Miroff and W. Booth‘Mexico’s Drug Cartel’s Newest Weapon: Cold War-era Hand Grenades Made in the US’Washington Post17 July 2010 http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2010/07/16/ AR2010071606252.html (last accessed 25 May 2013).

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 70

    Kansupra note 6.

  • 71

    Beittelsupra note 4 at 20.

  • 72

    Beittelsupra note 2 at 8.

  • 73

    Beittelsupra note 4 at 10.

  • 74

    San Antonio Timessupra note 11.

  • 75

     See Beittelsupra note 4 at 12.

  • 76

     See Manwaringsupra note 63 at 2.

  • 78

    Beittelsupra note 4 at 1.

  • 80

    Beittelsupra note 4 at 11.

  • 81

    Judahsupra note 20 at 71.

  • 82

    Leikensupra note 49 at 1.

  • 83

    CNNsupra note 10.

  • 90

    Geneva Convention Isupra note 85 Art. 3(1).

  • 92

    Buissupra note 27.

  • 96

    Geneva Convention Isupra note 85 at section 4(d).

  • 98

    Molzahn et al.supra note 36.

  • 101

    Human Rights Watchsupra note 99.

  • 103

    Henckaerts and Doswald-Becksupra note 95.

  • 105

    Geneva Convention Isupra note 85 Art. 50.

  • 106

    L. Gonzalez‘Mexico Police Scour Highways After PepsiCo Truck Torched’Reuters1 June 2012 http://www.reuters.com/article/2012/06/01/us-mexico-violence-pepsi-idUSBRE8501EV20120601 (last accessed 25 May 2013).

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 111

    R. Carroll‘Mexican Marine’s Family Gunned Down by Drug Cartel’The Guardian23 December 2009. http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2009/dec/23/mexican-marines-family-gunned-down.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 115

    Gutierrezsupra note 100.

Index Card

Content Metrics

Content Metrics

All Time Past Year Past 30 Days
Abstract Views 95 93 17
Full Text Views 187 187 3
PDF Downloads 26 26 3
EPUB Downloads 0 0 0