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A reviewof the application of canopy bridges in the conservation of primates and other arboreal animals across Brazil

In: Folia Primatologica
Authors:
Fernanda Zimmermann Teixeira Núcleo de Ecologia de Rodovias e Ferrovias, Programa de Pós-Graduação em Ecologia, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil

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https://orcid.org/0000-0002-5634-5142
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Lucas Gonçalves da Silva MCTI Instituto Nacional da Mata Atlântica, Santa Teresa, Espírito Santo, Brazil
Centro de Desenvolvimento Sustentável, Universidade de Brasília, Brasília, Brazil

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https://orcid.org/0000-0002-7993-9015
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Fernanda Abra Center for Conservation and Sustainability, Smithsonian’s National Zoo and Conservation Biology Institute, Washington, DC 20008, USA
ViaFAUNA Estudos Ambientais, São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil
Instituto Pró-Carnívoros, Atibaia, São Paulo, Brazil

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https://orcid.org/0000-0001-8102-7974
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Clarissa Rosa Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas da Amazônia, Coordenação de Biodiversidade, Manaus, Brazil

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Gerson Buss Instituto Chico Mendes de Conservação da Biodiversidade, Centro Nacional de Pesquisa e Conservação de Primatas Brasileiros, Cabedelo, Paraíba, Brazil

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https://orcid.org/0000-0003-0892-3005
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Marcello Guerreiro Concessionária Arteris Fluminense, Niterói, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

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Edson Rodrigues Costa Laboratório de Biologia da Conservação, Projeto Sauim-de-Coleira, Departamento de Biologia, Universidade Federal do Amazonas, CAPES (Coordenação de Aperfeiçoamento de Pessoal de Nível Superior), Manaus, Amazonas, Brazil

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Aline Souza de Menezes Medeiros Laboratório de Biologia da Conservação, Projeto Sauim-de-Coleira, Departamento de Biologia, Universidade Federal do Amazonas, CAPES (Coordenação de Aperfeiçoamento de Pessoal de Nível Superior), Manaus, Amazonas, Brazil

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https://orcid.org/0000-0003-4248-8078
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Marcelo Gordo Laboratório de Biologia da Conservação, Projeto Sauim-de-Coleira, Departamento de Biologia, Universidade Federal do Amazonas, CAPES (Coordenação de Aperfeiçoamento de Pessoal de Nível Superior), Manaus, Amazonas, Brazil

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Helio Secco Instituto de Biodiversidade e Sustentabilidade, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Macaé, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
FALCO Ambiental Consultoria, Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

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https://orcid.org/0000-0002-2781-3226
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Abstract

Brazil is known as a high biodiversity country, but at the same time, it has an extensive road network that threatens its wildlife and ecosystems. The impacts of roads and railways on vertebrates have been documented extensively, and the discussion concerning the implementation of mitigation measures for terrestrial wildlife has increased in the last decade. Arboreal animals are especially affected by the direct loss of individuals due to animal-vehicle collisions and by the barrier effect, because most arboreal species, especially the strictly arboreal ones, avoid going down to the ground to move across the landscape. Here we summarize and review information on existing canopy bridges across Brazil, considering artificial and natural canopy bridge initiatives implemented mainly on road and railway projects. A total of 151 canopy bridges were identified across the country, 112 of which are human-made structures of different materials, while the remaining 39 are natural canopy bridges. We found canopy bridges in three of the six biomes, with higher numbers in the Atlantic Forest and Amazon, the most forested biomes. Most of the canopy bridges are in protected areas (76%) and primates are the most common target taxa for canopy bridge implementation. Our study is the first biogeographic mapping and review of canopy bridges for arboreal wildlife conservation in a megadiverse country. We synthesize the available knowledge concerning canopy bridges in Brazil and highlight gaps that should be addressed by future research and monitoring projects.

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