Post-genocide Identity Politics in Rwanda and Bosnia and Herzegovina and their Compatibility with International Human Rights Law

in International Journal on Minority and Group Rights
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Rwanda and Bosnia and Herzegovina were scenarios of large-scale violence throughout the 1990s, substantiated by the manipulation of public and private discourses that denied diversity. After the conflicts, the states were faced with the challenge of addressing not only the consequences of the conflicts but also the constructed narratives behind them. In the two cases, public policies were implemented to elude further violence and strengthen a peaceful and long-term coexistence. Whether based on the rejection of ethnic identity or on the preservation of ethnic and national divides, both countries adopted policies that undermine basic rights and ignore sections of society excluded from official versions of history. Victimization is still a tool for political interests and remains present in public discourses. Irrespective of governmental policies that intend to surpass ancient animosities, divisionism is still present and underpins politics, religion, and social life in Rwanda and in Bosnia.

Post-genocide Identity Politics in Rwanda and Bosnia and Herzegovina and their Compatibility with International Human Rights Law

in International Journal on Minority and Group Rights

Sections

References

8

Neiersupra note 2 p. 51.

16

Straussupra note 1 p. 535.

20

Hintjenssupra note 13 pp. 12 16.

43

Sarajlicsupra note 41 p. 11.

46

Perrysupra note 38 p. 217.

70

Thornberrysupra note 64 p. 517.

74

Thornberrysupra note 65 p. 881.

75

Gilbertsupra note 53 p. 159.

76

Thornberrysupra note 65 p. 878.

77

Hilpoldsupra note 71 p. 186.

79

Hilpoldsupra note 71 p. 190.

80

Thornberrysupra note 65 p. 888.

83

Gilbertsupra note 53 p. 139.

85

Gilbertsupra note 53 p. 149.

87

Gilbertsupra note 53 p. 154.

89

Scheininsupra note 66 p. 4.

91

General Comment 23supra note 121 para. 7.

95

Hintjenssupra note 13 p. 16.

97

Longman and Rutagengwasupra note 93 p. 167.

101

Mollsupra note 50 p. 911.

109

Hintjenssupra note 13 p. 9.

112

Purdekovásupra note 12 p. 1.

113

Longman and Rutagengwasupra note 93 p. 178.

114

Hintjenssupra note 13 p. 6.

115

Report on Minority Issuessupra note 31.

117

Hintjenssupra note 13 p. 10.

123

Alternative Reportsupra note 35.

125

Perrysupra note 38 p. 215.

130

Sarajlicsupra note 41 p. 17.

142

Neiersupra note 2 p. 45.

144

Neiersupra note 2 p. 45.

145

Hintjenssupra note 13 p. 17.

146

Straussupra note 1 p. 530.

148

Hintjenssupra note 13 p. 25.

155

Wielengasupra note 9 p. 9.

157

Hintjenssupra note 13 p. 29.

162

Report on Minority Issuessupra note 31 p. 13.

165

Report on Minority Issuessupra note 31 para. 103.

168

Wielengasupra note 9 p. 7.

169

Hintjenssupra note 13 p. 31.

170

Freedmansupra note 99 p. 242.

171

Moshmansupra note 7 p. 132.

172

Wielengasupra note 9 p. 3.

174

Perrysupra note 38 p. 226.

175

Volppsupra note 154 p. 1580.

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