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Environmental and Collective Rights: Differences between Indigenous and Non-Indigenous ngo s Involved with the United Nations Human Rights Council

In: International Journal on Minority and Group Rights
Authors:
Maia Hallward School of Conflict Management, Peacebuilding and Development, Kennesaw State University, Kennesaw, GA, USA, mhallwar@kennesaw.edu

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Charity Butcher School of Government and International Affairs, Kennesaw State University, Kennesaw, GA, USA, cbutche2@kennesaw.edu

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Jonathan Taylor Downs School of Conflict Management, Peacebuilding and Development, Kennesaw State University, Kennesaw, GA, USA, jdowns8@kennesaw.edu

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Emily Cook School of Conflict Management, Peacebuilding and Development, Kennesaw State University, Kennesaw, GA, USA, ecook7@kennesaw.edu

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Abstract

Scholarship on human rights and environmental justice suggests that organizations vary in their messaging regarding outcomes related to environmental protection and sustainability, differences often found in the divide between the Global North and Global South. The literature also suggests that Indigenous organizations represent groups that traditionally focus on issues of sovereignty, while grappling with unique problems related to assimilation, cultural preservation, and oppression. This study utilizes empirical data gathered from 333 non-governmental organizations affiliated with the United Nations Human Rights Council to explore whether Indigenous and non-Indigenous organizations, which share many aspects of their mission with one another at the transnational level, differ on issues related to environment sustainability and collective identity rights. Our results indicate that Indigenous organizations take a more holistic approach in addressing the relationship between humans and the natural world, centring marginalized perspectives through restorative justice and the needs of current and future generations.

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