Towards a Theological Reading of Multifaith Spaces

in International Journal of Public Theology
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Abstract

Despite the existence of occasional shared or mixed religious spaces in the past, ‘multifaith spaces’ are relatively new phenomena and issues about their purpose, design, management, use and value are still emerging. While there is no ‘theology of multifaith spaces’, this article pursues an initial theological reading asking: how multifaith spaces relate to the heterotopias, non-spaces and Thirdspaces of some social theorists; what the theological issues around multifaith spaces are for those religious believers who use them; what theological approaches and language might begin to name and explore the potential of multifaith spaces for new shared understandings of human identity; and how multifaith spaces relate to notions of God.

Towards a Theological Reading of Multifaith Spaces

in International Journal of Public Theology

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References

2

C. Emmett‘The Siting of Churches and Mosques as an Indicator of Christian-Muslim Relations’Islam and Christian-Muslim Relations20:4 (2009) 451–76 at 461. This space is likely to have been the narthex by ancient tradition reserved for the unbaptised. However a report on the siege of the church in 2003 suggests Orthodox clergy were unaware of this tradition and only allowed the besieged Muslim soldiers to pray inside the church ‘given the circumstances’ see Carolyn Cole ‘Praying Toward Mecca’ in ‘2003 Pulitzer Finalist: Breaking News Photography’ Los Angeles Times <http://www.latimes.com/news/local/photography/la-ph-pulitzer-nativity-html05157251.htmlstory> [accessed 14 May 2013].

4

J. S. Fetzer and J. C. SoperMuslims and the State in Britain France and Germany (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press2005) p. 99.

8

Kwame A. AppiahCosmopolitanism (London: Penguin2006) p. xiii.

9

Ibid. pp. xvii 97 and 135 (original italics).

13

M. Foucault‘Of Other Spaces’Diacritics16:1 (1972) 22–7.

14

See P. SheldrakeSpaces for the Sacred: Place Memory and Identity (London: SCM2001) pp. 1–32.

16

M. AugéNon-Places: An Introduction to Supermodernity (London: Verso2008).

17

Ibid. pp. 35 and 63.

18

Ibid. pp. 64 and 87.

19

  Ibid. p. 90.

22

Edward W. SojaThirdspace (Malden: Blackwell1996) p. 57.

24

Ibid. p. 61.

25

Kearney and Taylor edsHosting the Stranger p. 1.

27

See P. Post and A. L. Molendijk edsHoly Ground: Re-Inventing Ritual Space in Modern Western Culture (Leuven: Peeters2010).

32

See G. D’Costa‘Interreligious Prayer Between Christians and Muslims’Islam and Christian-Muslim Relations24:1 (2013) 1–14 and C. W. Troll ‘Can Christians and Muslims Pray Together?’ The Way 50:1 (2011) 53–70. (2011).

34

Ibid. pp. 16–17.

35

RicouerOn Translation p. 22.

37

Ibid. p. 20.

40

Ibid. p. 70.

42

Ibid. p. 85.

43

Beaumont and Baker edsPostsecular Cities p. 92.

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