A Post-qur'ānic Religion Between Apostasy and Public Order: Egyptian Muftis and Courts on the Legal Status of the Bahā'ī Faith

in Islamic Law and Society
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Abstract

The more than 100-year presence of Bahā'īs in Egypt has caused a number of legal problems for Muslim jurists and Egyptian courts. Both have dealt with the status of Bahā'īs in personal status, criminal and administrative law. In this essay, I describe the solutions put forward by muftis and courts for novel problems generated by the presence of a post-Qur ānic religious minority in Egypt, and I analyze the interaction between shari a and state jurisdiction. Special attention is given to methods of dealing with issues that have no precedent in classical Islamic law, like the status of Bahā īs of non-Muslim descent and the consequences of apostasy for matters of administrative law or employment in public service.

A Post-qur'ānic Religion Between Apostasy and Public Order: Egyptian Muftis and Courts on the Legal Status of the Bahā'ī Faith

in Islamic Law and Society

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