Can the Subalterns Not Speak? On the Regime of Oral History in Socialist China

in Inner Asia
Restricted Access
Get Access to Full Text
Rent on DeepDyve

Have an Access Token?



Enter your access token to activate and access content online.

Please login and go to your personal user account to enter your access token.



Help

Have Institutional Access?



Access content through your institution. Any other coaching guidance?



Connect

Abstract

Rescuing the voice of 'the people' is arguably the most important mission of oral history, and it is now promoted in post-socialist or late socialist states such as China as an effective measure to rewrite history. This article argues, however, that socialist China was and remains in effect an oral-history regime, in which the people in whose name the Communist Party legitimises itself must speak up and narrate their life histories. Oral history in China is a manifestation of 'the people' making history, but it is also an instrument to process them from raw materials into products useful to the Party. This paper brings together issues on the ideologies of orality with the political power of history-making, as well as reflection on the terminological nuance needed to understand the language of 'oral history'.

Can the Subalterns Not Speak? On the Regime of Oral History in Socialist China

in Inner Asia

Sections

Information

Content Metrics

Content Metrics

All Time Past Year Past 30 Days
Abstract Views 24 24 3
Full Text Views 35 35 29
PDF Downloads 6 6 4
EPUB Downloads 0 0 0