Perceptions and Strategies in the Negotiation Process: A Cross Cultural Examination of U.S. and Malaysia

in International Negotiation
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Abstract

This article examines empirical findings of American (n=457) and Malaysian (n=347) college students regarding their perceptions and strategies utilized in the negotiation process. Several hypotheses comparing differences in cross-cultural negotiation styles, perceptions and strategies in negotiation are analyzed. The findings indicate that Malaysian students (from a collectivist culture) tend to have different negotiation perceptions, strategies and styles from those of their American counterparts (from an individualist culture). Specific differences are found in negotiation perceptions, risk taking, individual vs. group orientation, support of family culture, skill comfort level and gender differences. The importance of maintaining relationships with the other party during the negotiation was important in both groups, and both groups felt that they were effective negotiators. The findings extend previous research on cross-cultural negotiation styles with a discussion of specific process and strategy differences. Managerial implications of these findings and future research directions are also discussed.

Perceptions and Strategies in the Negotiation Process: A Cross Cultural Examination of U.S. and Malaysia

in International Negotiation

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