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An earwig (Insecta: Dermaptera) in Early Cretaceous amber from Spain

In: Insect Systematics & Evolution
Authors:
Michael S. Engel Division of Entomology, Natural History Museum, University of Kansas, Lawrence, KS 66045, USA
Department of Ecology & Evolutionary Biology, 1501 Crestline Drive, Suite 140, University of Kansas, Lawrence, KS 66045, USA

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David Peris Departament d’Estratigrafia, Paleontologia i Geociències Marines; and Institut de Recerca de la Biodiversitat (IRBio), Facultat de Geologia, Universitat de Barcelona, Martí i Franqués s/n, 08028 Barcelona, Spain

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Stylianos Chatzimanolis Department of Biological and Environmental Sciences, Dept. 2653, University of Tennessee at Chattanooga, 615 McCallie Avenue, Chattanooga, TN 37403, USA

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Xavier Delclòs Departament d’Estratigrafia, Paleontologia i Geociències Marines; and Institut de Recerca de la Biodiversitat (IRBio), Facultat de Geologia, Universitat de Barcelona, Martí i Franqués s/n, 08028 Barcelona, Spain

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The order Dermaptera (earwigs) is recorded for the first time from the Early Cretaceous ambers of Spain. Autrigonoforceps iberica Engel et Peris gen. et sp. n. is described and figured from a single, putative ♀ preserved in Albian amber from Peñacerrada I. Due to its trimerous tarsi and the absence of ocelli, the placement of the new fossil within the Neodermaptera is clear. Although it seems close to Labiduridae, its confident placement in any family is impossible given the limited visibility of several critical characters. The species is compared with the labidurid Myrrholabia from mid-Cretaceous amber of Myanmar.

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