Kingship and Ancestral Cult in the Northwest Palace at Nimrud

in Journal of Ancient Near Eastern Religions
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Abstract

Built in the early 9th century BCE, the Northwest Palace at Nimrud presented a new “imperial” architecture and iconography that was related to Assyrian expansionism at this time. Yet it also contained specific points of contact with the past via the royal Assyrian ancestors. A monument in the throneroom, the “center” of the state, provided the “public” view of this ideology, while one of the palace’s more secluded wings was devoted to the performance of ancestral cult. Through these and other means, rapid and fundamental socio-political change was accompanied by the idea of a logical and direct continuity with the history of Assyria.

Kingship and Ancestral Cult in the Northwest Palace at Nimrud

in Journal of Ancient Near Eastern Religions

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