Benjamin Franklin and the Holy See, 1783–1784

The Myth of Non-Interference in Religious Affairs

in Journal of Early American History
Restricted Access
Get Access to Full Text
Rent on DeepDyve

Have an Access Token?



Enter your access token to activate and access content online.

Please login and go to your personal user account to enter your access token.



Help

Have Institutional Access?



Access content through your institution. Any other coaching guidance?



Connect

Benjamin Franklin played a significant role in the early encounter between Rome and the United States. By highlighting Franklin’s role one is likely to question the two main tenets of traditional Catholic historiography in this regard. First of all, that the Holy See did not unwillingly submit itself to any imposition of newly-devised American democratic procedures in selecting how best to deal with the new republic. Secondly, that Franklin did constantly intervene in religious matters, at least as far as these concerned the establishment of the Catholic Church in the United States. In fact, the adoption of a democratic form of selection of the higher hierarchy was easily accepted and indeed exploited by the Holy See. Furthermore, much was going on underneath the official doctrine of the separation between church and state. This resembled old-regime diplomatic wrangling and had Franklin as its main protagonist.

Benjamin Franklin and the Holy See, 1783–1784

The Myth of Non-Interference in Religious Affairs

in Journal of Early American History

References

24

[Antonelli] to Carroll 9 June 1784ser. Lettere vol. 244 ff. 492v-495rv; [Antonelli] to Doria Pamphili 31 July 1785 ser. Lettere vol. 244 ff. 624rv-625rv both apf.

Index Card

Content Metrics

Content Metrics

All Time Past Year Past 30 Days
Abstract Views 18 18 12
Full Text Views 12 12 12
PDF Downloads 2 2 2
EPUB Downloads 0 0 0