Syphilis, Sex, and Marriage in Early Modern Spain

in Journal of Early Modern History
Restricted Access
Get Access to Full Text
Rent on DeepDyve

Have an Access Token?



Enter your access token to activate and access content online.

Please login and go to your personal user account to enter your access token.



Help

Have Institutional Access?



Access content through your institution. Any other coaching guidance?



Connect

Abstract

Although scholarship on the early modern syphilis epidemic has greatly increased our understanding of the medical, institutional, and individual responses to this illness, little is known about patients’ familial and personal lives beyond the hospital walls. Examining patients treated at Toledo’s Hospital de Santiago in the mid-seventeenth century, this article analyzes their attitudes towards sexuality and marriage as they lived with chronic venereal disease. Produced in a post-Tridentine context that ideally emphasized individual control of sexual sin, the hospital and notarial records patients left behind reveal ambivalence towards sexuality and marriage. Not only did competing messages on sexuality affect patients who displayed expressive sexual lives under specific circumstances, but only those who engaged communal networks, socioeconomic position, and medical assumptions on sexuality and disease successfully managed to marry.

Syphilis, Sex, and Marriage in Early Modern Spain

in Journal of Early Modern History

Sections

Information

Content Metrics

Content Metrics

All Time Past Year Past 30 Days
Abstract Views 14 14 7
Full Text Views 19 19 12
PDF Downloads 9 9 5
EPUB Downloads 0 0 0