The Sexual Politics of Empire: Civic Honor and Official Crime outside Renaissance Venice

in Journal of Early Modern History
Restricted Access
Get Access to Full Text
Rent on DeepDyve

Have an Access Token?



Enter your access token to activate and access content online.

Please login and go to your personal user account to enter your access token.



Help

Have Institutional Access?



Access content through your institution. Any other coaching guidance?



Connect

Abstract

This article examines a series of cases in which the Venetian state prosecuted officials who had committed “crimes against honor” during their terms in office. These crimes were mostly sexual in nature, and they thus provide a window into the way that the Venetian state perceived individual and collective honor of state, subject, and officeholder. A key part of the self-definition and thus the reputation of the Venetian state was its ability to ensure peace and defend order. Sex crimes by officials representing the Venetian state did not just violate subjects’ honor; they implicated the Venetian state as a whole in “lawless and tyrannical” actions and undermined Venetian attempts to legitimate its republican empire. The prosecutions of these officials also reveal the sometimes blurry boundaries between public service and private interests in the Venetian state’s administration of its empire.

The Sexual Politics of Empire: Civic Honor and Official Crime outside Renaissance Venice

in Journal of Early Modern History

Sections

Information

Content Metrics

Content Metrics

All Time Past Year Past 30 Days
Abstract Views 13 13 4
Full Text Views 36 36 25
PDF Downloads 10 10 4
EPUB Downloads 0 0 0