From Lateness To Waning To Crisis: the Burden of the Later Middle Ages

in Journal of Early Modern History
Restricted Access
Get Access to Full Text
Rent on DeepDyve

Have an Access Token?



Enter your access token to activate and access content online.

Please login and go to your personal user account to enter your access token.



Help

Have Institutional Access?



Access content through your institution. Any other coaching guidance?



Connect

Abstract

The common view of the Late Middle Ages as a time of decay is due to the very lateness imposed on this period by the idea of a Middle Ages, especially in the form of the "Waning model" created by Johan Huizinga in The Waning of the Middle Ages. The consequent "crises" predicated of most late-medieval phenomena, including the whole period, appear under critical analysis either as phantoms or as moments of progressive development. This discredits both the Waning model and the "Middle Ages" out of which it proceeds; they can best be replaced by the scheme that posits an "Old Europe" from the eleventh century to the eighteenth. Here the Middle Ages vanish and the fourteenth and fifteenth centuries, redeemed from the curse of lateness, appear with the twelfth and thirteenth as Early Old Europe.

From Lateness To Waning To Crisis: the Burden of the Later Middle Ages

in Journal of Early Modern History

Sections

Index Card

Content Metrics

Content Metrics

All Time Past Year Past 30 Days
Abstract Views 11 11 5
Full Text Views 6 6 6
PDF Downloads 5 5 5
EPUB Downloads 0 0 0