UNEASY PEACE: THE PRACTICE OF THE STALLUNG RITUAL IN ZÜRICH, 1400-1525

in Journal of Early Modern History
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Abstract

This article discusses the Stallung or "peace bidding" ritual in the imperial city of Zürich during the fifteenth and early sixteenth centuries. According to city law, every Zürcher had to ask quarrelling citizens to make peace, and the contestants were then obligated to end their fight. The discussion of Stallung in this article is informed by practice theory as developed by Pierre Bourdieu and Sherry Ortner. While habitus or structure constrains and produces the goals of social actors, those social actors also enact and transform structure. The meaning of the Stallung ritual was not stable, but subject to constant situational adjustment. The Stallung ritual may have prevented outbreaks of violence in many instances, yet the evidence demonstrates that the ritual was often absorbed into the ongoing dynamic of challenge and riposte that shaped contests over honor between male citizens.

UNEASY PEACE: THE PRACTICE OF THE STALLUNG RITUAL IN ZÜRICH, 1400-1525

in Journal of Early Modern History

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