Assimilation and Revolt in the Territory of Isauria, From the 1st Century BC to the 6th Century AD

in Journal of the Economic and Social History of the Orient
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Abstract

This article investigates shifts in the scale and organization of violence in the region of Isauria during the period of Roman rule. In contrast with the fundamental paper of B. Shaw in JESHO, volume 33 (1990), which argues that Isaurian violence was a constant in all periods of history, this study attempts to show that major Isaurian uprisings were brought under control from the mid-first century to the mid-third century AD. In these centuries the Isaurians became increasingly sedentarized, adopted Hellenistic social and political structures, and cooperated with the Roman state actively, particularly as soldiers. Only after the midthird century did Isauria again turn against Rome, this time with increased strength built on the economic and social development it had experienced under Roman rule.

Assimilation and Revolt in the Territory of Isauria, From the 1st Century BC to the 6th Century AD

in Journal of the Economic and Social History of the Orient

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