Notes on the Ottoman Poll-Tax Reforms of the Late Seventeenth Century: The Case of Crete

in Journal of the Economic and Social History of the Orient
No Access
Get Access to Full Text
Rent on DeepDyve

Have an Access Token?



Enter your access token to activate and access content online.

Please login and go to your personal user account to enter your access token.



Help

Have Institutional Access?



Access content through your institution. Any other coaching guidance?



Connect

Abstract

In 1691 the Ottoman government abolished the old system of collecting the poll-tax (cizye) from non-Muslim subjects; instead of imposing a standard rate per household, the tax would be levied per person according to three classes: rich, middle-class and poor. In 1670, the same reform had been implemented in Crete and the Aegean. Some observations concerning the distribution of the taxpayers into the three classes raise the question of how these latter were defined; it seems that no legal definition was used and that taxpayers declared at will their economic situation. Furthermore, a close study of the implementation of the reform in Crete shows that the government underwent a long process of negotiation and compromise, proposing alternative forms of maktu (lump sum) collection and fixed percentages.

Notes on the Ottoman Poll-Tax Reforms of the Late Seventeenth Century: The Case of Crete

in Journal of the Economic and Social History of the Orient

Sections

Information

Content Metrics

Content Metrics

All Time Past Year Past 30 Days
Abstract Views 30 30 4
Full Text Views 64 64 36
PDF Downloads 6 6 2
EPUB Downloads 0 0 0